Government, Law and National Security Major

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree BA, Government, Law and National Security

Department Chair David C. Wright, Jr., PhD

For information contact Brian Carso, Jr, JD, PhD

The program in Government, Law and National Security (GLNS) at Misericordia University is designed to prepare students to enter the expanding national security work force within both government and the private sector. Students will achieve an integrated knowledge of political science, legal studies, behavioral science, management, history, and national security studies focused on the deterrence, detection, and mitigation of domestic and international threats to the public safety. The program equips graduates with a solid academic foundation for entry level career employment and mid-level career mobility opportunities in broad areas of criminal justice, public safety and security services, government and court administration, and legal services. In addition, the GLNS degree will prepare students for graduate study in law, government administration, business, and national security studies.

Program Goals and Outcomes

The following are program goals for the Government, Law, and National Security major:

  1. To provide students with an interdisciplinary background in liberal arts.
  2. To broaden students’ perspectives on local, national, and international issues
  3. To foster an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and action, by providing a critical approach to evaluating past and present events
  4. To promote the development of problem-oriented analysis which can be used to assess and address situations among diverse individuals, groups, communities, and organizations
  5. To foster an understanding of human values and moral considerations, and of how to incorporate an ethical awareness into problem-solving strategies that reflects the values of mercy, justice, service, and hospitality
  6. To afford students the opportunity to develop and increase their capacity for analysis, evaluation, and strategic implementation of concepts
  7. To educate students in basic quantitative analysis and interpretation
  8. To familiarize students with American and international political and economic systems and institutions
  9. To broaden students’ political understanding and enhance their ability to interpret the significance of political events and to analyze the dynamics of political power
  10. To educate students in the principles and institutions of the American legal system
  11. To inculcate in students a broad understanding of national security and its history, concepts, institutions, and methods
  12. To enhance students’ abilities to synthesize various ideas and perspectives to develop explanations, theories of causation, and strategies for conflict and problem resolution
  13. To cultivate the ability to think, write, and speak clearly with thoroughness and independence

The Government, Law, and National Security major program goals are realized in the following student learning outcomes:

  1. Evaluate American and international political and economic systems, institutions, issues, and activities
  2. Interpret the significance of political significance of political events
  3. Analyze the dynamics of political power
  4. Critically evaluate both historical and current events, with an eye toward the human motivation behind them
  5. Develop problem-oriented strategies to address situations among diverse individuals, groups, communities, and organizations
  6. Identify the moral dimension of political, economic, and social issues
  7. Develop strategies for problem-solving that incorporate the values of mercy, justice, service, and hospitality
  8. Evaluate strategic concepts, using quantitative analytical methods where appropriate
  9. Describe the specific functions of various legal institutions, including law enforcement agencies, criminal and civil courts, and administrative agencies
  10. Interpret law and legislation
  11. Evaluate legal and ethical implications of national security methods
  12. Critically analyze the history, concepts, methods, and institutions of national security, broadly understood
  13. Synthesize ideas and perspectives to develop explanations, theories of causation, and strategies for conflict and problem resolution
  14. Communicate clearly and persuasively both verbally and in writing
  15. Pursue life-long learning, facilitated by a solid foundational understanding of local, national, and international governmental, legal, and national security institutions