Majors & Minors

College of Arts and Sciences
Degree: B.A., History
Department Chair: David C. Wright, Jr., Ph.D.

Following a major course of study in history provides a student with a strong liberal arts background. The study of history can broaden a student’s perspective on local, national, and international issues. It fosters an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and action, providing a critical approach to looking at the past. The history program cultivates the ability to think, write, and speak clearly with thoroughness and independence.

History majors must fulfill the College's core curriculum requirements in addition to completing 33 credits in history. Advanced history courses require six credits of core history/political science courses as prerequisites.

Admission Requirements

The minimum criteria for admission into the History program as a freshman student are:
  1. Class rank in the top half of the high school graduating class and/or a cumulative 2.5 grade point average
  2. Minimum combined SAT score of 850 for Critical Reading and Math (combined) if taken prior to March 5, 2016, or 930 if taken after March 5, 2016. In lieu of the SAT, ACT results may be presented with a minimum required composite score of 18
Successful transfer applicants will typically hold a minimum collegiate grade point average of 2.0, having completed at least 15 college credits, and have a proven record of success in high school.

Please note the above listed requirements are general, and that each application is looked at thoroughly, taking into account individual grades, academic rigor, and other factors.

Candidates for general admission are reviewed on a rolling admission basis by the committee on admissions. The decision to admit a student is based on the student’s intended field of study and on an evaluation of the student’s qualifications.

Continuation as a history major requires that the student maintain a minimum of a 2.0 or “C” average in the major and a similar total grade point average. A student on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the major.

Transfer students must complete all the history requirements as listed in the sequence of courses in the University Catalog.

History Major

History Major

College of Arts and Sciences
Degree: B.A., History
Department Chair: David C. Wright, Jr., Ph.D.

Following a major course of study in history provides a student with a strong liberal arts background. The study of history can broaden a student’s perspective on local, national, and international issues. It fosters an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and action, providing a critical approach to looking at the past. The history program cultivates the ability to think, write, and speak clearly with thoroughness and independence.

History majors must fulfill the College's core curriculum requirements in addition to completing 33 credits in history. Advanced history courses require six credits of core history/political science courses as prerequisites.

See Sequence of Required Courses for History Majors

General Requirements

Incoming first-year students seeking admission as history majors must meet the general and specific admissions requirements of the university as stated in this catalog. In cases where the student does not fully meet them, a personal interview is required.

Continuation as a history major requires that the student maintain a minimum of a 2.0 or “C” average in the major and a similar total grade point average. A student on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the major.

Transfer students must complete all the history requirements as listed in the sequence of courses in this catalog.

Internships

Internships for history majors are assigned on the basis of availability. Pre-law internships are required as a part of the pre-law specialization. Majors who desire to pursue internships must receive prior approval of the department chair or work out the details with the pre-law advisor. Internships may only be taken if the student has a “B” average in the major and is a fully accredited junior or senior.

Recommendations

To receive a recommendation for graduate study or law school, the student must maintain the minimum of a “B” in the major, pre-law specialization, and total grade point average.

Sequence of Required Courses

Freshman Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HIS 101Western Civilization I3HIS 102Western Civilization II3
MTHMath Bank I3MTHMath Bank II3
ENGCore3ENGCore3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3PHLCore3
POL 100American Natl. Government3POL 103GGlobal Politics3

Sophomore Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
FACore3FACore3
SCICore3SCICore3
BEBSoc., Psych. or Econ.3BEBSoc., Psych. or Econ.3
HIS 103U.S. History I3HIS 104U.S. History II3
Free elective3Free elective3

Junior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HIS 405Seminar on History3HIS 491Junior Research Seminar3
RLSCore3RLSCore3
HIS 210History of England3HISFree elective3
Free elective3HISFree elective3
HIS/POLFree elective3Free elective3

Senior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HISFree elective3HIS/POLFree elective3
ENGFree elective3ENGFree elective3
HIS/POLFree elective3SOC 221Cultural Minorities3
Free elective3Free elective3
Free elective3GEO 202Cultural World Geography.3

Total required for graduation 120 credits

History, Pre-Law

History, Pre-Law

Degree: B.A., History

Department Chair: David Wright, Ph.D.

Pre-Law Director:Brian Carso, Ph.D.

The Pre-Law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of American Law Schools which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts background. The program provides a sound preparation for the Law School Admission Test and the graduate study of law.

The program has been carefully designed to develop ability in expression and analytical comprehension, to afford basic information about human institutions and values, and to cultivate the ability to think critically with thoroughness and independence.

Admission to, and success in, law school depends upon completion of a rigorous understanding of the law school admission process.

Students may choose to major in English, History, or Philosophy. Upon satisfactory completion of the major program requirements and the Pre-Law program requirements, the student will earn a bachelor of arts degree in English, History, or Philosophy with a Pre-Law specialization.

Pre-Law students must fulfill the general and specific requirements of the College and of the specific major as stated in the catalog for retention in the program and for recommendation to law school.

Pre-Law students should register with the Program Director's office, where advice on course selection and information concerning the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and law schools can be obtained.

Sequence of Required Courses

First Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HIS 101Western Civilization I3HIS 102Western Civilization II3
PHL 100Intro to Philosophy3PHLCore3
BEBSociology, Psychology, or Econ.3BEBSociology, Psychology, or Econ.3
ENGCore3ENGCore3
POL 100American National Government3POL 103Global Politics3

Sophomore Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
FACore3FACore3
MTHMath Bank I3MTHMath Bank II3
HIS 103U.S. History I3HIS 104U.S. History II3
POL 251Law Seminar I3POL 252Law Seminar II3
SCICore3SCICore3

Junior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HIS 405Seminar on History3HIS 491Junior Research Seminar3
RLSCore3RLSCore3
HIS 210History of England3HISFree Elective3
POL 405American Constitutional Law I3POL 406American Constitutional Law II3
Free elective3Free elective3

Senior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second SemesterTotal Credits15
HISCore3HIS/POLCore3
ENGCore3ENGCore3
SOC 221Cultural Minorities3GEO 202Cultural World Geog.3
POL 450Law Internship I3POL 451Law Internship II3
BUS 352Business Law3POLAdvanced Elective3

The total required for graduation 120 credits.

History, Secondary Education Certification

History, Secondary Education Certification

Degree: B.A., History

Department Chair: David Wright, Ph.D.

Secondary Education: Allan Austin, Ph.D.

The secondary education program in History (HIS/SECED) is designed to prepare teachers of history and the other social studies for Grades 7-12. The program emphasizes studies in history with a number of courses in political science, geography, sociology, and anthropology. A unique aspect of the HIS/SECED program is that it prepares teachers to effectively deal with students with disabilities who are likely to be included in their classes. It is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a PA Instructional I certificate. The University's recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by PDE on the required battery of certification tests, qualify graduates for a PA Instructional I certificate. Pennsylvania has signed an Interstate Agreement through the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification which facilitates certification in other states. States’ requirements vary; graduates should determine what they have to do to become certified in a state other than Pennsylvania.

Pre-service teachers in the HIS/SECED program must successfully complete the University's liberal arts Core Curriculum, a content major in History, and series of Teacher Education Department courses. HIS/SECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field/practicum experiences that begin during the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent approximately 750 hours in community classrooms. During students' final semester, they must complete two seven-week student teaching assignments (two separate placements).

Students in the History/Secondary Education have two academic advisors. The TED advisor is responsible for advising related to Education courses and field/practicum experiences. The content area advisor is responsible for advising related to the University Core and content major requirements. Each semester, students must meet with both advisors prior to registration to facilitate course selection and receive approval to register. The student is ultimately responsible for the selection and registration of courses.

Sequence of Required Courses

First Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second
Semester
Total Credits15
HIS 101Western Civilization I3HIS 102Western Civilization II3
SOC 101Comparative Sociology3ENGAmerican or British
Literature Core
3
ENG 151University Writing Seminar3SCINatural Science Core with Lab4
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3FAFine Arts Core3
TED 121Educational Technology3PHLPhilosophy Core3
TED 100Education Seminar0TED 131Cultural Awareness1
TED 190Education Seminar Field0TED 191Freshman Field0

Sophomore Year

First
Semester
Total Credits18Second
Semester
Total Credits18
HIS 103United States History I3FAFine Arts Core3
SCIScience Core3MTH 115Statistics3
MTHMath Bank 1 Core3HIS 104United States History II3
RLS 104World Religions3SPE 111Special Ed. and
Exceptional Learners
3
TED 232Educational Psychology3TED 271Classroom Management2
TED 243Adolescent Development3TED 377Classroom Mgt Sec Ed1
TED 292Sophomore Field0TED 293Sophomore Field II0

Junior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits17Second
Semester
Total Credits18
HIS 405Seminar on History3HIS 491Research Seminar3
POL 100American National Govt.3POL 103Global Politics3
RLSCore3GEO 202Cultural World Geography3
HISAdvanced Elective3HIS/POLAdvanced Elective3
BUSEconomics Core3ENGAdvanced Elective3
TED 310Teacher PA History1TED 369Curr/Methods in Sec Ed3
TED 351Intro to Instr Planning1TED 397Practicum II0
TED 396Practicum I0

Senior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits16Second
Semester
Total Credits16
HIS 210History of England3HISAdvanced Elective3
HISAdvanced Elective3TED 498Student Teaching9
ENGAdvanced Elective3TED 411ELL Methods2
SOC 222Cultural Minorities3TED 412Professional Practice2
SPE 411Inclusive Practices3
TED 495Practicum III1

Total required for graduation 135 credits

History Major/Organizational Management Dual Degree Program

History Major/Organizational Management Dual Degree Program

Degree BA, History (conferred at the completion of bachelor's requirements)

Department Chair David C. Wright, Jr., PhD

Degree MS, Organizational Management (conferred at the completion of master's requirements)

Department Chair Corina Slaff, PhD

The five-year history BA./ organizational management M.S. program allows students to tailor the history major to their future professional interests in management. Constructed in conjunction with the Business department, this program allows students to complete a B.A. in History and an M.S. in Organizational Management over a five-year course of study (completing the remaining 24 credits of coursework for the M.S. typically requires enrollment in the summer, fall and spring immediately following the conferral of the bachelor's degree).

Students are guaranteed admission to the MS program in Organizational Management as long as (1) they maintain a 3.0 cumulative undergraduate gpa; (2) maintain a 3.0 gpa in OM core classes; and (3) complete their BA degree in History as scheduled.

For more information click here: http://catalog.misericordia.edu/8729.htm

Sequence of Required Courses

First Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15Second
Semester
Total Credits15
HIS 101Western Civilization I3HIS 102Western Civilization II3
HIS 103US I3HIS 104US II3
MTHMath Group A3MTHMath Group B3
ENG/RLSUniversity Writing Seminar3ENG/RLS Core3
PHL 100Intro to Philosophy3PHLPhilosophy Core3


Sophomore Year

First
Semester
Total Credits16 Second
Semester
Total Credits15
FAFine Arts Core3GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 3
SCIScience Core (with lab)4SCICore3

Behave Sci Core3
Behave Sci Core3
POL 100American National
Government
3POL 103Global Politics3
SOC 221Cultural Minorities3Free Elective3


Junior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15 Second
Semester
Total Credits15
HIS 405Seminar on History3HIS 491Research Seminar3
ENG/RLS Core3ENG/RLS Core3
HIS 210 or 211 History of England or
History of Britain
3HISAdvanced Elective3
HIS/POLAdvanced Elective3HISAdvanced Elective 3

Free Elective3
Free Elective3


Senior Year

First
Semester
Total Credits15 Second
Semester
Total Credits15
HISAdvanced Elective 3HIS/POLAdvanced Elective 3
ENGAdvanced Elective3ENGAdvanced Elective3
HIS/POLAdvanced Elective3FAFree Elective3
OMCore Class*3OMCore Class3
OMCore Class*3OMCore Class3

*To satisfy OM core classes in their senior year, students may select from the following:

OM 500 - Organizational Behavior

OM 509 - Financial Management

OM 515 - Research Methods

OM 530 - Legal Aspects of Administration

OM 538 - Perspectives in Management

OM 545 - Introduction to Human Resources

OM 551 - Organizational Communication


Fifth Year - all remaining OM classes to complete the degree (24 credits)

Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

    1. The following are program goals for the History major, in which students will:
    2. Broaden perspectives on local, national, and international issues
    3. Understand the complexity of human motivations
    4. Provide a critical approach to looking at the past
    5. Cultivate writing and oral communication skills
    6. Foster cultural understanding

    The History major program goals are realized in the following student learning outcomes:

    1. Students will identify major events and issues in local, national, and international history and/or politics
    2. Students will identify different historical and theoretical perspectives
    3. Students will be able to analyze primary and secondary sources
    4. Students will be able to use primary and secondary sources to make an argument
    5. Majors will write a research paper that asks a significant historical or political science question
    6. Majors will present historical, policy, or political arguments and analysis in an oral presentation
    7. Majors will identify key attributes of global regions

    The following are program goals for the Government, Law, and National Security major:

    1. To provide students with an interdisciplinary background in history, political science, and related disciplines.
    2. To cultivate the ability to think, write, and speak clearly with thoroughness and independence.
    3. To foster an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and action across a diverse set of individuals, groups, communities, and organizations, by providing a critical approach to evaluating past and present events and issues of historical, legal, and/or political significance.
    4. To promote an understanding of human values and moral considerations, and of how to incorporate an ethical awareness into problem-solving strategies that reflects the values of mercy, justice, service, and hospitality.
    5. To afford students the opportunity to develop and increase their capacity for qualitative and quantitative analysis and evaluation of local, national and international issues and the strategic implementation of concepts and policy options for conflict and problem resolution.
    6. To familiarize students with the political, economic, legal, and national security institutions and processes in the United States and the international community, and their histories.

    The Government, Law, and National Security major program goals are realized in the following student learning outcomes:

    1. Students will evaluate American and international economic, legal, and/or political systems, institutions, issues, and activities.
    2. Students will be able to critically assess the concepts, history, institutions, laws, and methods of national security, broadly understood.
    3. Students will be able to critically evaluate both historical and current events to identify intentions and motivations of action.
    4. Students will identify and explain the ethical, legal, and/or moral dimension of political, economic, and social issues.
    5. Students will be able to develop explanations, theories of causation, and strategies for conflict and program resolution.
    6. Students will be able to communicate clearly and persuasively both verbally and in writing.

    Course Descriptions

    HIS 101 History of Western Civilization I, 3 credits

    This course is a study of the main currents in Western cultural, social, political, and intellectual history from the classical period to the Napoleonic era. Emphasis is on the social development of culture and the intellect of the classical period and how Western society has transformed and strengthened them. The course includes discussions of texts from a critical point of view along with written assignments.

    HIS 102 History of Western Civilization II, 3 credits

    This course is a study of the main currents in Western cultural, social, political, and intellectual history from the Napoleonic era to the present. Emphasis is on the social themes that influenced and shaped the modern Western world. The course will include discussions of texts from a critical point of view along with written assignments

    HIS 103 United States History to 1865, 3 credits

    A survey of significant political, economic, social, and intellectual themes in the development of the United States from Colonial times until 1865.

    HIS 104 United States History since 1865, 3 credits

    American society is based upon combined cultures and groups. This course is a study of how that multicultural framework is embedded in the narrative of American history since the Civil War. Emphasis is on the participation, problems, and contributions of women, Native Americans, African Americans, immigrants, labor, and other minority groups. This course includes analytical writing and discussion of readings.

    HIS 105 Turning Points in American History, 3 credits

    This course will examine episodes in history that have resulted in transformations to life in America. The scope of the course will range from colonial settlement to the computer age, and will cover topics in government, law, science, medicine, culture, communication, and the formation of national identity. Using a wide range of primary source documents, students will study the forces that led to these transformative events, the decisions that set them in motion, and the outcomes and consequences that resulted.

    HIS 110 Spies, Traitors and Saboteurs, 3 credits

    This course will use narratives of espionage and treason to examine broad questions of loyalty, betrayal, and allegiance. From Benedict Arnold through the War on Terror, specific instances of political and social turmoil will be examined through the lens of political obligation in order to reveal competing conceptions of national identity and the limits of dissent.

    HIS 115 Introduction to U.S. Environmental History, 3 credits

    This course studies America's relationship with nature and environmental preservation from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis is placed on political, economic, social, and intellectual themes that have influenced American's views of the natural world.

    HIS 120 The U.S. in a World at War, 3 credits

    This course studies American foreign relations and global interactions since 1898. Situating U.S. history in a global context, emphasis is placed on political, economic, social and intellectual themes as students explore how Americans both shaped and were shaped by a globe torn apart by two world wars. Using both primary and secondary sources, students will develop an understanding of our past and what it means for us today.

    HIS 125 Modern U.S. History Through Popular Culture, 3 credits

    This course studies the history of the modern United States through the lens of popular culture, an increasingly influential force in American life. Situating the U.S. in a global context, emphasis is placed on political, economic, social, and intellectual themes as students examine how Americans coped at home and abroad with the wider world. Students will work with a wide range of popular culture--including film, television, music, and literature, among others--as primary documents.

    HIS 151 University Writing Seminar, 3 credits

    This course introduces and develops skills and abilities fundamental to proficient academic writing. This course emphasizes the critical reading and the summary, synthesis, and analysis of primary materials in specific historical contexts. (Offered Fall 2014 and Spring 2015)

    HIS 151A University Writing Seminar, 3 credits

    This course introduces and develops skills and abilities fundamental to proficient academic writing through the study of U.S. history. This course emphasizes the critical reading and the summary, synthesis, and analysis of primary materials in specific social and historical contexts. (First offered Fall 2015)

    HIS 151B University Writing Seminar, 3 credits

    This course introduces and develops skills and abilities fundamental to proficient academic writing through the study of outside of the United States. This course emphasizes the critical reading and the summary, synthesis, and analysis of primary materials in specific social and historical contexts. (First offered Fall 2015)

    HIS 155 Nineteenth-Century European History, 3 credits

    This course will study the history of Europe from the French Revolution to World War I. Interconnecting the political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual developments of the era, emphasis will be placed on themes such as the impact of the industrial revolution on society, European imperialism, and recurrent political upheaval.

    HIS 160 Contemporary Europe, 3 credits

    This course will study the history of Europe from the early twentieth century to the present day. Situating the countries of Europe in a global context, emphasis will be placed on political events as well as economic, social, cultural and intellectual trends. The course will cover events from World War I to the creation of the Euro currency and persons from Germany's Adolf Hitler to Russia's Vladimir Putin.

    HIS 165 The History of Human Rights, 3 credits

    This course is a study of the origin and development of the idea of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present with emphasis on the French Revolution, feminism, liberalism, decolonization, and contemporary human rights issues.

    HIS 170 The Holocaust: History, Memory and Legacy, 3 credits

    This course studies the origins and history of the Holocaust, from ancient anti-Semitism to the mass murders committed by the Nazis from 1941-45. The courses concludes with a consideration of the political and cultural legacy of the Holocaust.

    HIS 175 Introduction to Middle Eastern History, 3 credits

    This course will examine the history of the Middle East from the seventh century to the present, focusing on broad regional themes such as the development of Islamic traditions, the rise of empires, the development of nationalism, colonialism, the post-WWII, current crises, and the relationship between the Middle East and the West. Using primary and secondary sources, students will develop an understanding of the historic context of contemporary issues in the region.

    HIS 180 Introduction to World History, 3 credits

    This course provides a broad introduction to important issues in the study of world history. It combines a thematic and chronological approach to the study of the non-western world, exposing students to such topics as empires and colonialism, immigration, industrialization, cultural development, the slave trade, urbanization, and other issues pertinent to the field. (First offered Fall 2015)

    HIS 201 History of 19th Century Revolutions, 3 credits

    Detailed study of the political, social and intellectual events that culminated in the revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848. Emphasis is on the industrial and economic conditions that led to 19th century radical movements.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand)

    HIS 204 Survey of Latin America: Modern, 3 credits

    History 204 surveys Latin American civilization from 1810, the era of Independence, to the contemporary period. Part I takes up the history of nineteenth-century Latin America, first analyzing the challenges of independence, and then describing the impact of economic modernization from 1870. Part II examines the 20th century-the era of Latin American Revolutions.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand)

    HIS 207 History of Russia, 3 credits

    Study of the great Kievan empire, the Mongol yoke, the rise of Muscovite Tsars, the expansion of absolutism, and empire and social revolution.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 208 History of the Soviet Union, 3 credits

    The development of the Soviet Union from its revolutionary beginnings in 1917 through social upheaval, the terror of the purges, the tragedy and triumph of World War II, and the dismantling of the Soviet system.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 210 History of England, 3 credits

    A detailed study of the Tudor-Stuart period. Emphasis is on the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The course culminates with the crisis between crown and parliament under the Stuart kings.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 211 History of Britain, 3 credits

    The development of British history from 1689 to the present. This course stresses the development of parliamentary government, the growth of the empire, and the emergence of Great Britain as a leading world power.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 213 Modern French History, 3 credits

    This course surveys the events of the Napoleonic Era, Restoration Period, July Monarchy, Second Republic, Second Empire, and Third Republic. It concludes by examining France during and since World War II. In addition to the country’s stormy political history, social and cultural changes are also analyzed.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 221 World Wars, Cold War, and Beyond, 3 credits

    In the 20th century, the United States emerged as the world’s strongest nation. This course offers a survey of U.S. foreign relations during that time. It examines issues, including both World Wars, origins and history of the Cold War, episodes of international revolutionary nationalism, wars in Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf, U.S./Latin American relations, years of nuclear deterrence, and the challenges of globalization.

    Prerequisite: POL 100 and POL 103

    HIS 309 The American West, 3 credits

    This seminar will examine both the historical reality and the mythical attraction of the frontier in American history. Students will examine and interpret historical, literary and artistic works that depict ideas about the American West. The overall goal will be for students to understand the effect the frontier has had on our history and national identity.
    Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years

    HIS 320 Selected Studies in History, 3 credits

    A lecture and discussion approach to the study of special themes in history. On request, students may take this course more than once if the theme they are studying differs.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand)

    HIS 321 Nazi Germany, 3 credits

    An in-depth study of totalitarianism focusing primarily in Germany from 1920–1945. Emphasis on the career of Adolph Hitler, the SS, the Nazi state, the destruction of European Jewry, and World War Two. Secondary emphasis on the phenomena of racism and nationalism.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 309 The American West, 3 credits

    This seminar will examine both the historical reality and the mythical attraction of the frontier in American history. Students will examine and interpret historical, literary and artistic works that depict ideas about the American West. The overall goal will be for students to understand the effect the frontier has had on our history and national identity.
    Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years

    HIS 320 Selected Studies in History, 3 credits

    A lecture and discussion approach to the study of special themes in history. On request, students may take this course more than once if the theme they are studying differs.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand)

    HIS 321 Nazi Germany, 3 credits

    An in-depth study of totalitarianism focusing primarily in Germany from 1920–1945. Emphasis on the career of Adolph Hitler, the SS, the Nazi state, the destruction of European Jewry, and World War Two. Secondary emphasis on the phenomena of racism and nationalism.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 325 The Civil War Era, 3 credits

    This course examines the regional events leading to the outbreak of the Civil War, the prosecution of the War, and its aftermath. It surveys the experiences of Americans—southern and northern, white and black–exploring how they were affected by and how they influenced the events of the time and nation.
    Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years

    HIS 326 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 3 credits

    This course provides detailed coverage of some of the major themes and problems of American society between 1876 and 1920, including (but not limited to) immigration, urban slums, the rise of big business, empire, female suffrage, labor and the working class, reform, segregation, and the "threat" of mass entertainment and consumer culture. Engaging in both primary and secondary source readings, this course evaluates the ways in which this period provided a "foundation" for American society in the twentieth century.

    Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence.

    Fall 2016, and alternate years thereafter

    HIS 328 American Women’s History, 3 credits

    This course explores women’s experiences in the United States from Colonial times to the present. It surveys women of different ethnic, racial, and class backgrounds, exploring how women were affected by, and how they themselves influenced the historic events of the nation.
    Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years

    HIS 330 Immigration and American Ethnic History, 3 credits

    This course examines the history of the United States as the history of immigration. Emphasis is placed on better understanding the multicultural history of the United States through the study of both primary and secondary evidence.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 340 Film and History, 3 credits

    This course examines the relationship between film and history with an emphasis on the utility of studying film to better understand the past.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 341 Introduction to Public History, 3 credits

    This course provides a general introduction to the field of public history, its methodologies, its primary sources, and some challenges to the practice. Class meetings will digest readings from current scholarship in the field, some problems related to interpretation and display, and important analytical and research strategies. Students in the course will hone their research and critical thinking skills through written assignments, research projects, and/or presentations.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey.

    Fall 2015, and alternate years thereafter.

    HIS 342 History of Medicine and Health, 3 credits

    This course provides an overview of developments in Western medical science and health care from antiquity to the present. Themes covered include: the evolution and transmission of medical knowledge, the impact of epidemic disease, the patient experience, and role of the practitioner in society. Students in History of Medicine and Health will explore the links between medicine and health and their cultural, social, political, and intellectual contexts.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey.

    HIS 350 Post-1945 United States History, 3 credits

    This course examines the history of the United States from the end of World War II through today. Students will deepen their knowledge of both domestic history and United States foreign policy through the use of primary and secondary evidence. Students will also draw connections between the recent past and important issues in today's society.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of either History or Political Science survey.

    HIS 353 American Capitalism and the Global Economy, 3 credits

    This course provides an analysis of the historical origins and development of American capitalism, from the late-eighteenth century to the present. It examines the shifting nature of capitalism and the ways that it has framed both the role of the U.S. government (broadly construed) and the social experience of the American people, as well as America's role in the global economy.
    Prerequisites: Two semesters of introductory-level history courses.

    HIS 354 Culture and National Security, 3 credits

    This course presents an overview of the ways in which culture interacts with and helps to shape national security policy-making. Topics covered will include the historical creation of an American identity as well as a variety of case studies in post-World War II American history. The course will consider the ways in which often unexamined assumptions about race, gender and religion have helped to define the United States' interactions with the world.
    Prerequisite: HIS 221

    HIS 361 Race and Graphic Narrative in the Post-War United States, 3 credits

    This course examines the representation of race and ethnicity in the United States from the end of World War II though today. Through the examination of a variety of graphic formats (narratives, films, television, etc.), students will deepen their knowledge of how race and ethnicity have been represented and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of those representations, through the use of primary and secondary evidence. Students will also draw connections between these texts and contemporary U.S. culture and society. May not be taken if the student has already completed ENG 361.
    Prerequisite: Completion of the History/Political Science Core.

    HIS 362 American Visual Culture, 3 credits

    This course will explore the ways that visual culture illuminates and alters our understanding of major themes and eras in U.S. history. Drawing upon popular culture, objects, films, monuments, architecture, and other artworks, this course explores the ways in which history can be taught and learned through images. The course investigates the ways in which different visual media documented, articulated, and embodied social, cultural, and political issues, ideas, and identities from the American Revolution through the end of the Cold War.
    Prerequisite: Completion of the History/Political Science Core.

    Spring 2015, and alternate years thereafter

    HIS 363 History of Cinema, 3 credits

    This course examines film in an historical setting, with an emphasis on studying film to better understand society and culture. The class will view and analyze feature films in roughly chronological order, cover the cinema in countries around the globe, as well as of the United States.

    Prerequisite: Completion of the History/Political Science Core.

    2015-16 academic year, and alternate years thereafter

    HIS 364 History of Rock and Roll, 3 credits

    This course surveys the development of rock music as a musical genre and as a force in popular culture since the 1950s. Students will become able to identify important performers and styles in rock music. Changes in the music will be analyzed in the context of cultural, social, and political trends an events. Transformations in technology affecting the production and consumption of music will also be examined.
    Prerequisite: Completion of the History/Political Science Core.

    Spring 2015, and alternate years thereafter

    HIS 405 History Seminar, 3 credits

    A reading and discussion seminar focusing on one of the following topics: recent American history or European intellectual history.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Offered annually

    HIS 407 European Cultural Movements, 3 credits

    The course introduces the student to the major artistic and literary movements of late 19th and early 20th century continental Europe. The student develops an understanding of the historical and aesthetic significance of such avant-garde movements.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 408 Europe Since 1945, 3 credits

    This course describes and analyzes the economic, social, political, and cultural developments that have taken place in Europe since 1945. Major topics that are studied include rebuilding Europe physically and psychologically after World War II, the advent of the Cold War, the events of 1968, and recent problems, such as reactions to immigration.
    Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years

    HIS 410 Seminar on Global Issues, 3 credits

    A reading and discussion seminar focusing on different political, social, and economic issues which affect the late 20th-century world. This course explores current issues in an historical perspective.
    (On demand)

    HIS 413 History Cooperative Education, 3-12 credits

    Academic study combined with work experience in the community.
    Prerequisite: Permission of director. (On demand)

    HIS 440 Public History Practicum, 3 credits

    This course aims to immerse students in the practice of public history and to develop related professional skills by enabling them to contribute to a finished piece of public history scholarship, such as an exhibit or other public presentation. Through guided professional training, students will hone their research and critical thinking skills in written assignments, research projects, and/or presentations.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of introductory-level History courses and instructor approval

    HIS 450 History Internship, 3 credits

    Directed field experience in archival and/or museum projects for junior and senior students. Students are supervised by professional staff in cooperation with history faculty. Permission of the instructor required.
    Prerequisite: Permission of director. (On demand)

    HIS 480 Independent Study, 1-3 credits

    Special investigation of a selected topic.
    (On demand)

    HIS 491 Research Seminar, 3 credits

    An introduction to historical methods and research. Students select a topic for a bachelor thesis and then are guided in their research and writing. Offered annually. Required of history majors, usually taken in the junior year.
    Prerequisites: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey

    Minors

    Minors

    View the Academic Catalog-Colleges of Arts and Sciences Minors to see course descriptions for History, Political Science, and/or Social Studies Minors.



    History Minor

    College of Arts and Sciences

    The study of History has been one of mankind's most favored pursuits since the beginning of recorded time. The History minor may be taken in conjunction with any degree program to broaden one's world perspective, develop critical judgment, cultivate the ability to reason, and foster intellectual growth.

    COURSE SEQUENCE

    HIS 101History of Western Civilization I 3
    HIS 102History of Western Civilization II3
    HIS 103United States Survey to 18653
    HIS 104United States Survey Since 18653

    PLUS:

    Six (6) credits of Advanced History Electives
    Total : 18 credits


    Political Science Minor

    College of Arts and Sciences

    The Political Science minor offers students interested in law, politics, or government a useful foundation in these areas. The minor, which may be taken in conjunction with any major, will broaden political understanding and enhance the ability to interpret the significance of political events and to analyze the dynamics of political processes.

    COURSE SEQUENCE

    POL 100American National Government3
    POL 103Global Politics3
    POL 251Law Seminar I3
    POL 252Law Seminar II3
    POL 405American Constitutional Law I3
    POL 406American Constitutional Law II3
    POL 480Independent Study3
    POLElective3
    Total: 21 credits


    Social Studies Minor

    College of Arts and Sciences

    The minor in Social Studies is intended to enrich and broaden the student's understanding of the world in which we live. It can be taken in conjunction with any degree program with the intent to foster critical judgment, cultivate the ability to reason, and develop an ability to understand social scientific methods of analysis.

    COURSE SEQUENCE

    HISHistory Electives (2)6
    POLAdvanced Political Science Elective3
    GEO 202Cultural World Geography3
    SOC 221Cultural Minorities3
    BUS 207Contemporary Economics3
    Total: 18 credits

    powered by finalsite