Graduate DPT Admission

Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS)

Graduate students are admitted into the DPT program on a space-available basis. Applicants must submit an application using the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service. Applicants who apply through PTCAS will submit a completed web-based application comprised of biographical data, colleges and universities attended, academic course history, physical therapy observation hours, list of reference providers, work experience, extracurricular activities, honors, professional licenses, and a personal essay. It is the applicant's responsibility to read and follow all PTCAS and program-specific instructions.

The 2017-2018 PTCAS admissions cycle begins in July, 2017 and ends on April 15, 2018. Applicants may start and submit the PTCAS application at http://www.ptcas.org


The next graduate applications will be for the cohort that begins in Spring 2019. The deadline for submitting an application for graduate admission into the DPT program is April 15, 2018. Contact the Admissions Office for further information: www.admissions.misericordia.edu.

Policies related to grading and transfer of credit to the University, as well as the academic calendar can be found in the “Academics" section of the University catalog. Click here - Policies.



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Essential Functions for the Physical Therapy Student

These essential functions are the activities that a student physical therapist must be able to perform, with or without accommodations, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for successful completion of the professional curriculum. They are applicable in the classroom, laboratories, simulated clinical settings, and while on clinical education assignments. The University uses independent clinical education sites that may or may not be willing or able to offer the same reasonable accommodations that are made available by the University. (updated March 2015)

Link to Essential Functions:
Essential Functions

Background Check & Drug Screening Notice

A positive criminal record check, positive child abuse history and/or a positive drug screening may result in any of the following:

  • inability to find or delay in finding a clinical placement
  • dismissal from a clinical placement
  • inability to obtain professional licensure
  • legal ramifications
  • inability to matriculate or continue in physical therapy program
  • inability to meet requirements for graduation from the program

As a result, a student with a positive criminal record check, positive child abuse history, and/or a positive drug screen may not be able to complete the requirements of the physical therapy program, may not be eligible for licensure required for practice, and may be dismissed from the program.

Internal Graduate Admission

Students who currently attend Misericordia University and who wish to apply for admission into the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) graduate program will be evaluated by the Physical Therapy Admissions Committee, along with external transfer applicants. Admission to the Physical Therapy major is not guaranteed, and is on a space available basis.

The criteria for admission into the DPT graduate program are:

  • Completion of requirements for baccalaureate degree.
  • Completion of required prerequisite courses with a grade of at least C for each course.
  • Cumulative GPA of at least 3.2.
  • Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented paid or volunteer experience of 50 or more hours in at least two different facilities or a minimum of one year's full-time professional experience within the health care system.
  • Evidence of Medical Terminology competency, which can be fulfilled in several ways:
    1. Demonstration of college level credit-bearing coursework of at least one credit, with a grade of C or better.
    2. Completion of "Advanced Medical Terminology with Sound Recordings", non-credit course available at www.webbycyberclasses.com.
    3. Completion of MI 106 Medical Terminology (1 credit) with a grade of C or better.
      • Offered for non-Medical Imaging students in Spring semester only.
      • Medical Imaging majors have priority for registration for this course.
      • Students wishing to pursue this option should register during their junior year.
    4. Previous employment or training in a health care profession involving the use of medical terminology.
      • Must be approved by the Physical Therapy Department

Additional requirements specific to the prerequisite Natural Science courses (CHM 104 General Chemistry, CHM 105 Introduction to Organic & Biochemistry, BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology I, BIO 212 Anatomy & Physiology II, PHY 117 Introductory Physics I, and PHY 118 Introductory Physics II, or their equivalents):

    • The student's transcript may have no more than one grade of C for the prerequisite Natural Science courses.
    • The student may repeat no more than one prerequisite Natural Science course.

External Graduate Admission

The criteria for admission into the DPT graduate program are:

  • Completion of requirements for baccalaureate degree.
  • Completion of required prerequisite courses with a grade of at least C for each course.
  • Cumulative GPA of at least 3.2.
  • Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented paid or volunteer experience of 50 or more hours in at least two different facilities or a minimum of one year's full-time professional experience within the health care system.
  • Evidence of Medical Terminology competency, which can be fulfilled in several ways:
    • Demonstration of college level credit-bearing coursework of at least one credit, with a grade of C or better.
    • Completion of "Advanced Medical Terminology with Sound Recordings", non-credit course available at www.webbycyberclasses.com.
    • Previous employment or training in a health care profession involving the use of medical terminology.
      • Must be approved by the Physical Therapy Department.

Additional requirements specific to the prerequisite Natural Science courses (General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Anatomy & Physiology , and Physics):

  • The student's transcript may have no more than one grade of C for the prerequisite Natural Science courses.
  • The student may repeat no more than one prerequisite Natural Science course.

If SAT scores are older than five years, GRE or Miller's Analogy Test scores are required.

Prerequisite Courses

CHM 104 General Chemistry with lab4 credits
CHM 105 Introduction to Organic Chemistry with lab 4 credits
PHY 117Introductory Physics I with lab4 credits
PHY 118Introductory Physics II with lab4 credits
BIO 211Anatomy & Physiology I with lab4 credits
BIO 212Anatomy & Physiology II with lab4 credits
PSY 123Introduction to Psychology3 credits
SOC 101Comparative Sociology3 credits
MTH 115Basic Statistics3 credits
PSY 275Child & Adolescent Psychology3 credits
PSY 290Psychopathology3 credits

Graduate DPT Curriculum

Student Goals and Expected Outcomes

Student Goals

Graduates of the program will:

  1. Be prepared to practice as physical therapist generalists capable of contemporary, reflective, competent, legal, autonomous and ethical practice,
  2. Competently utilize and contribute to, evidence for the validation and advancement of the art and science of physical therapy,
  3. Apply appropriate and effective teaching methods to educate others,
  4. Effectively communicate and interact with colleagues from various disciplines for the benefit of optimal service to clients, and
  5. Respect and respond to individual differences in interactions with clients, families, colleagues and the community.

Student Expected Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the physical therapy education program, graduates will be able to competently:

    1.1 Perform in the area of professional practice.
    • Demonstration of professional behaviors
    • Adherence to APTA Core Values and Code of Ethics
    1.2 Perform in the area of patient/client management, including:
    • Screening
    • Examination, evaluation, diagnosis
    • Prognosis, plan of care
    • Intervention
    • Outcomes assessment
    1.3 Perform in the area of care delivery, including:
    • Prevention, health promotion
    • Fitness, wellness
    • Supervision and direction of support staff
    • Consultation
    1.4 Perform in the area of practice management, including:
    • Business and administrative practices
    • Demonstrate evidence-based practice by identifying, analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing sources of information to support clinical decisions.
    • Develop educational programs that are effective for intended audiences.
    • Communicate and collaborate with others in an accurate, appropriate and timely manner.
    • Provide optimal care in a compassionate manner that considers client wishes and respects cultural and societal values.

PSU Articulation Agreement

Articulation Agreement between
The Pennsylvania State University
& Misericordia University

This agreement is an arrangement for qualified graduates of the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Pennsylvania State University to matriculate into the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Misericordia University.The articulation agreement contains eligibility information.

DPT Course Descriptions

Doctor of Physical Therapy Course Descriptions

DPT 800 Academic Success Skills, 1 credit

This course will assist the student in assessing academic strengths and weaknesses, and to develop and implement a plan to address weaknesses.

Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status

DPT 801 Applied Physiology, 4 credits

The study of physiological mechanisms affecting physical therapy examination, evaluation and intervention. Includes physical agents, exercise, and modifying variables as related to maintaining and restoring homeostasis. Also includes applied cardiovascular, respiratory, and exercise physiology. Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status

Spring

DPT 802 Orthotics and Prosthetics in Physical Therapy, 1 credit

This course is designed to instruct physical therapy students in the physical therapy management of individuals with upper and lower extremity amputation, and incorporation of orthotic devices in patient/client management. (Lecture: 2.5 hours per week for 6 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 809, DPT 823, DPT 839, DPT 853, DPT 855, DPT 857.

Co-requisites: DPT 825, DPT 833, DPT 847, DPT 849, DPT 880. Fall

DPT 803 Human Anatomy I, 4 credits

The first of two courses that study human anatomy, emphasizing structure and function in relationship to human movement, inter-relationships of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary systems, and intraabdominal structures. This course emphasizes building a foundation in human anatomy that will be built upon in the second course and integrated in clinical courses. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours.)
Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status..

Spring

DPT 805 Medical Conditions I, 3 credits

The first of three courses to study disease processes, medical management (including pharmacology), medical screening (including diagnostic imaging and lab testing), and elementary to advanced differential diagnosis. (Lecture: 3 hours.)
Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status.

Spring

DPT 807 Movement Science I, 4 credits

The analysis of human movement is taught from the developmental, kinesiological, and biomechanical perspective. The student will learn functional anatomy, kinesiology and pathokinesiology of the joints, posture, functional movement patterns of the neck, trunk and limbs as a foundation for evaluation and intervention strategies of the musculoskeletal system. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours.)
Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status.
Spring

DPT 809 Human Anatomy II, 2 credits

The second of two courses that study human anatomy, emphasizing structure and function in relationship to human movement, inter-relationships of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, vascular, and integumentary structure. This course builds upon the foundation built in Human Anatomy I and includes further exploration of structures and relationships using cadaver dissection. Evidence for the anatomical basis of examination and intervention is explored. (Lecture: 1 hour, Lab: 3 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813, DPT 815, DPT 817, DPT 821, DPT 829, DPT 851.

Co-requisites: DPT 853, DPT 855, DPT 857,
Spring


DPT 811 Physical Therapy Clinical Skills I, 2 credits

The first of two courses introducing patient handling and physical therapy tests and measurements and intervention strategies. This may include assessment and monitoring of vital signs, goniometry, manual muscle testing, modalities of heat, cold, sound, and water and therapeutic exercise. Introduces problem solving, communication, and patient management skills. (Lab: 4 hours.)
Prerequisites: Graduate DPT students.

Spring

DPT 813 Evidence-based Practice I, 3 credits

The first of a four-course sequence provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research processes. The course emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary to read and critically evaluate professional literature. (Lecture: 3 hours.)

Prerequisites: Graduate DPT status

Co-requisites: DPT 815, DPT 829, Fall

DPT 815 Medical Conditions II, 3 credits

The second of three courses to study disease processes, medical management (including pharmacology), medical screening (including diagnostic imaging and lab testing), and elementary to advanced differential diagnosis. (Lecture: 3 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 805

Co-requisites: DPT 813, DPT 829. Fall

DPT 817 Movement Science II, 3 credits

The study of motor control, motor learning, typical motor development, clinical application of kinesiology and biomechanics of the joints, posture, functional movement patterns of the neck, trunk, and limbs and gait will be taught as a foundation for examination and intervention strategies in the presence of movement dysfunction associated with the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. (Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 2 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 801, DPT 803, DPT 805, DPT 807, DPT 819, DPT 811.

Co-requisites: DPT 851, DPT 821. Fall

DPT 819 Professional Issues I, 1 credit

The first of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 1 hour.)

Prerequisites: Graduate DPT students.

Spring

DPT 821 Physical Therapy Clinical Skills II, 2 credits

The second of two courses introducing patient handling and physical therapy tests and measurements and intervention strategies. This may include goniometry, manual muscle testing, posture and gait assessment, massage, therapeutic exercise, gait training and objective tests for different neurological conditions. Encourages problem solving, communication, documentation and patient management skills. (Lab: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 801, DPT 803, DPT 805, DPT 807, DPT 819, DPT 811.

Co-requisites: DPT 817, DPT 851, Fall

DPT 823 Evidence-based Practice II, 2 credits

The second of a four-course sequence provides the knowledge and skills necessary to access and utilize best evidence in making clinical decisions. Content from Evidence-based Practice I is integrated into this course in the continued development and application of skills needed for critically evaluating literature and physical therapy practice. (Lecture: 2 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813

Co-requisites: DPT 839. Spring

DPT 825 Medical Conditions III, 3 credits

The third of three courses to study disease processes, medical management (including pharmacology), medical screening (including diagnostic imaging and lab testing), and elementary to advanced differential diagnosis. (Lecture: 5 hours/week for 6 weeks; Lab: 4 hours/week for 6 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 853, DPT 823, DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, DPT 839.

Co-requisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 849. Fall

DPT 829 Professional Issues II, 2 credits

The second of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 1.5 hours, Lab: 1 hour.)

Prerequisites: DPT 819

Co-requisites: DPT 813, DPT 815 Fall

DPT 833 Evidence-based Practice III, 2 credits

The third of a four-course sequence emphasizes the planning and conducting of an evidence based practice project that involves developing a focused question and conducting a literature search and review, including critical evaluation and evidence based practice grading. Building upon skills presented in Evidence Based Practice I and II, the course provides opportunities for enhancing the knowledge and skills needed for critical evaluation of the literature and other forms of information. (Lecture: 5 hours/week for 6 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 853, DPT 823, DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, DPT 839.

Co-requisites: DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849. Fall

DPT 837 Clinical Education I, 10 credits

This is an eight-week, full-time clinical education experience, occurring during the fourth semester in the program (Summer II). This experience will provide the opportunity for integration of current professional competencies into direct patient care using problem solving strategies. Facilitation from physical therapy clinical faculty will assist in the utilization of these skills in critically analyzing a variety of patient and role problems. This experience will begin the process of professional socialization and cultivation of interpersonal communication skills; clinical decision making; self-assessment; proactive learning; and development of personal values, attitudes, and motivations in relationship to ethical, legal, and moral practice. (40 hours per week for 10 weeks.)

Prerequisites: DPT 853, DPT 823, DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, DPT 839. Summer.

DPT 839 Professional Issues III, 1 credit

The third of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 1 hour.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813, DPT 815, DPT 829,

Co-requisites: DPT 823 Spring

DPT 843 Evidence Based Practice IV, 4 credits

The fourth of a four-course sequence continues with the evidence based practice process of critical evaluation of information related to a focused question and obtaining the best evidence. The course provides opportunities for discussion and exercises in the integration of best evidence with clinical judgment and client values to determine the best care for a client. Content from Evidence Based Practice I, II, and III is integrated into this course in the continued critical evaluation of literature and physical therapy practice. (Lecture: 2 hours, Seminar: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849.

Co-requisites: DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880. Spring

DPT 847 Clinical Education II, 10 credits

This is an eight-week, full-time clinical education experience occurring during the fifth semester of the program (Fall II). This experience will build upon Clinical Education I and incorporate the additional competencies attained in didactic and laboratory work. Students will continue to use problem-solving strategies in direct patient care, under the guidance of physical therapy clinical faculty. A variety of patient populations and problems will be provided to allow for full integration of professional knowledge and skills in total patient care. The students will be encouraged to reflect upon their knowledge and skills to identify problem areas to be addressed in Clinical Education II. Further development of interpersonal skills, clinical decision making, self-assessment, proactive learning, and professional socialization is expected. (10 weeks.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849. Fall

DPT 849 Professional Issues IV, 2 credits

The fourth of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 2 hours/week for 8 weeks, Lab: 4 hours/week for 8 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 853, DPT 823, DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, DPT 839.

Co-requisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825. Fall

DPT 851 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I, 5 credits

This course will introduce the student to skills necessary for physical therapy examination of and intervention for problems of the musculoskeletal system primarily involving the upper and lower extremities. A number of examination and intervention principles utilized throughout the musculoskeletal system will be examined, as well as joint-specific principles. These principles will then be applied to the anatomy and biomechanics of the specific regions of the upper and lower extremities. Pathologies will be explored in light of their regional effects on the anatomy and biomechanics, as well as the effect of these changes in mechanics on the function of the body as a whole. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 801, DPT 803, DPT 805, DPT 807, DPT 819, DPT 811.

Co-requisites: DPT 817, DPT 821. Fall

DPT 853 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy, 4 credits

This course explores cardiopulmonary anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, and the effects of aging on these systems. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction as a complication of other medical conditions is stressed. Screening, examination, evaluation, differential diagnosis, intervention and modification within the scope of physical therapy practice are emphasized. Integration of medical laboratory studies, medical diagnoses, graded exercise testing with EKG analysis, and pharmacological factors with PT examination and intervention planning are analyzed. Intervention stresses environmental and lifestyle factors, health and wellness attitudes, and physical therapy as integral to patient and public education. Classroom, laboratory, group, and clinical sessions are used to facilitate integration of competencies and skills. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813, DPT 815, DPT 817, DPT 851, DPT 829, DPT 821.

Co-requisites: DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, Spring

DPT 855 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II, 4 credits

This course is a continuation of Musculoskeletal PT I. The principles studied in this course are related to the examination of and intervention for dysfunction of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spines and the TMJ. In addition principles specific to spinal pathology and mechanics will be introduced. Pathologies investigated in Musculoskeletal PT I that affect the extremities will be re-examined in regard to their effect on the spine. (Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813, DPT 815, DPT 817, DPT 851, DPT 829, DPT 821.

Co-requisites: DPT 853, DPT 809, DPT 857, Spring

DPT 857 Neuromuscular Physical Therapy I, 5 credits

This course will review neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology with expansion to neurological examination, intervention and rehabilitation. Analysis of posture and movement during the normal process of development and aging as well as in clients with neurological impairments will be emphasized. Current movement theory, postural control, and motor learning research will be applied and integrated with knowledge gained in previous coursework for clinical decision making in evaluation and selection of appropriate intervention strategies. The theoretical basis and treatment techniques for selected neuromotor techniques such as PNF, NDT and sensory integration will also be included. Laboratory sessions will emphasize the development of specific psychomotor examination and intervention skills necessary for the successful examination, evaluation and intervention of clients across the lifespan. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 813, DPT 815, DPT 817, DPT 851, DPT 829, DPT 821.

Co-requisites: DPT 853, DPT 809, DPT 855. Spring

DPT 859 Professional Issues V, 3 credits

The fifth of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 2 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849.

Co-requisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 880. Spring

DPT 861 Integumentary Physical Therapy, 3 credits

This course provides the student with an opportunity to synthesize materials learned to date within the physical therapy program in the context of integumentary physical therapy. Cooperative learning, independent research, and evidence-based practice on specific topics related to Integumentary physical therapy are integral components of the class. Topics include wound healing, special tests, nutrition and oxygen for healing, modalities for wound healing, dressings, and adjunctive therapies. (Lecture: 4 hours/week for 8 weeks, Lab: 4 hours/week for 8 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 853, DPT 823, DPT 809, DPT 855, DPT 857, DPT 839.

Co-requisites: DPT 833, DPT 825, DPT 849. Fall

DPT 863 Neuromuscular Physical Therapy II, 4 credits

A continuation of Neuromuscular Physical Therapy I. This course will focus on the selection, performance and analysis of selected intervention strategies for patients with disorders involving the neuromuscular system. The theoretical basis and treatment techniques for selected neuromotor techniques such as PNF, NDT and sensory integration will also be included. Laboratory sessions will emphasize the development of specific psychomotor examination and intervention skills necessary for the successful examination, evaluation and intervention of clients across the lifespan. (Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 4 hours.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849.

Co-requisites: DPT 843, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880. Spring

DPT 865 Patient Client Management, 4 credits

Exploration of the physical therapy management of clients and patients with multiple diagnoses. Includes consultation, screening, examination, intervention and prevention, closely linked to evidence-based practice. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours for Spring 2015. Lecture: 3 hours, Seminar: 1 hour for Spring 2016 and later. Approved 10/30/2014.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849.

Co-requisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 859, DPT 880. Spring

DPT 867 Clinical Education III, 10 credits

This is an eight-week, full-time clinical education experience occurring in the seventh semester of the program (Summer III). This experience builds upon Clinical Education II and incorporate the additional competencies attained in didactic and laboratory work. Students will continue to use problem-solving strategies in direct patient care, under the guidance of physical therapy clinical faculty. A variety of patient populations and problems will be provided to allow for integration of professional knowledge and skills in total patient care. Students will be encouraged to reflect upon their knowledge and skills to identify problem areas to be addressed in Clinical Education IV. Further development of interpersonal skills, clinical decision making, self-assessment, proactive learning, and professional socialization is expected. (10 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880. Summer

DPT 869 Professional Issues VI, 2 credits

The sixth of six courses to study issues related to professional practice expectations: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, integrity, professional duty, communication, cultural competence, clinical reasoning, evidence-based practice and education. (Lecture: 2 hours/week for 6 weeks, Lab: 2.5 hours/week for 6 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880.

Co-requisite: DPT 879. Fall

DPT 877 Clinical Education IV, 10 credits

This is a ten-week full-time clinical education experience occurring in the eighth semester of the program (Fall III). This experience may occur at the same facility on a different rotation or in a different clinical setting. In this experience the student should seek patient populations or problems with which they have limited exposure and/or lack mastery of entry-level skills. Students also should actively seek, where possible, opportunities in teaching, critical inquiry/research, administration/management, and quality assurance. Patient evaluation and intervention skills should be fine-tuned. Additional emphases should be placed upon addressing clinical decision making, goal setting/functional outcome measures, modification of intervention plans, and the role of physical therapy in a dynamic health care system. (40 hours per week for 10 weeks.)

Prerequisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880. Fall.

DPT 879 Doctoral Seminar, 2 credits

In this course, students will present a personal project of professional significance and will provide feedback to and receive feedback from their peers. (Seminar: 4.5 hours/week for 6 weeks)

Prerequisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859, DPT 880.

Co-requisite: DPT 869. Fall

DPT 880 Physical Therapy Electives, 3 credits

This offering allows physical therapy students in their sixth semester the opportunity for study in up to three professional specialty areas. Topics vary from year to year, depending on student interest and the availability of faculty with professional expertise. Topics may include clinical specialties such as sports physical therapy, geriatrics, or pediatrics, or role specialties such as administration, teaching, or community health. Independent study or a graduate course outside the physical therapy department may be arranged with permission of program faculty. (Lecture: variable, Lab: variable.)

Prerequisites: DPT 833, DPT 861, DPT 825, DPT 849.

Co-requisites: DPT 843, DPT 863, DPT 865, DPT 859. Spring

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