SLP Courses & Clinical Information

Speech-Language student working and being observed

The Speech-language curriculum at Misericordia University prepares students to be well rounded professionals by providing a curriculum, grounded in the liberal arts, that combines evidence based practice and research.

Download full SLP Course Sequence Guide

SLP Major & Clinical Course Sequence

First Year Students

Fall Semester

Credits

Spring Semester

Credits

Social Science Core (ASHA)

3

Social Science Core (ASHA)

3

Natural Science Core (Physical Science 135/175) (ASHA)

4

Natural Science Core (ASHA) (Bio 105)

3

ENG 151 (Writing Seminar) Core

3

HIS or POL Core

3

SLP 210 Introduction to Com Dis

3

ENG Core Course

3

Math Bank I - 165

3

SLP 215 Development Across the Lifespan (ASHA)

3

FA Core Course

3

Total

16

Total

18


Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Credits

Spring Semester

Credits

HIS or POL Core

3

MTH 115 Statistics (ASHA)

3

Free Elective

3

RLS 104 Core

3

PHL 100 Core

3

FA Core Course

3

SLP 220 A&P of Speech and Hearing Science

3

SLP 250 Speech and Hearing Science

3

SLP 230 Phonetics

3

SLP 330 Intro to Audiology

3

SLP 260 Artic/Phon/Lang Dis

3

SLP 305 Ob & Clinic Procedures I

2

Total

18

Total

17


Junior Year

Fall Semester

Credits

Spring Semester

Credits

PHL Core Course

3

RLS Core

3

SLP 301 Literacy and SLP in Schools (Elective)

3

SLP 310/512 Research Methods (Writing Intensive) (ASHA)

3

SLP 435 Communication Disorders in Autism

3

SLP 445 Medical Speech-Language Pathology

3

SLP 325 Stutt/Voice/Cleft Palate

3

SLP 450 Optional Clinic (requires prereqs) (Elective)

3

SLP 350 Adult Communication Disorders

3

SLP 480 Special Topics (Elective)

3

SLP 415 Ob & Clinical Procedures II

2

Elective
3



Total

17

Total

18


Graduate Year I (Senior Year)

Fall Semester

Credits

Spring Semester

Credits

SLP 500 Artic & Phon Disorders

3

SLP 510 Fluency Disorders

3

SLP 530 Voice Disorders

3

SLP 525 Child Language Dis

3

SLP 590 Dysphagia

3

SLP 545 Aphasia & Cog Comm Dis

3

SLP 560 Diag (3cr) with SLP 555 Diag Clinic (1 cr) Or SLP 505 Clinic I (sec I-IV)

4

3

SLP 585 SLP Seminar III

3

SLP 565 SLP Seminar I

1

SLP 560 Diag (3 cr) with SLP 555 Diag Clin (1 cr) OR SLP 605 Clinic II (sec I-IV)

4

3

SLP 575 Motor Speech Disorders

3

SLP 566 SLP Seminar II

1

SLP 515 Hearing Sem students split

1

SLP 515 Hearing Sem students split

1




Total (18 cr with Diagnostics)

17*

Total (18 cr with Diagnostics)

17*

Graduate Year I (Senior Year)

Summer Session I

Credits

Summer
Session II

Credits



SLP 540 AAC

3

SLP 560 Diag (3 cr) with SLP 555 Diag Clin (1 cr) Or

4

SLP 602 Summer Clinic II (I-IV)

3

SLP 601 Sum Clin I (I-IV)

3

Total (4 cr with Diagnostics)

3*

Total (6 cr with SLP 602)

3*


Graduate Year II (Fifth Year)

Fall Semester

Credits

Spring Semester

Credits

SLP 610 Fieldwork I (Education Specialist Cert)

9

SLP 620 Fieldwork II (Education Specialist Cert)

9

SLP 680 Thesis Option/SLP 660 Comps Class

3

SLP 650 Professional Issues

3

Total

12

Total

12


Note 1: Students are required to take two clinics (e.g., SLP 505, 605, 601, or 602) and are only required to take SLP 560 Diagnostics (3cr) with SLP 555 Diagnostic Clinic (1cr) once and SLP 515 Hearing Seminar once; Students will be split between the two semesters of SLP 515 Hearing Seminar (Fall/Spring Graduate I - Senior Year).

Note 2: Students who pursue Education Specialist Certification will need to pass the PRAXIS-SLP and complete a fieldwork in an educational setting.

Note 3: Students may need to take SLP 630 - a third field placement until they have satisfied the department's and ASHA's certification requirements pertaining to clinical experiences.

Note 4: For prerequisites, please refer to the catalog or advising sheet.

Download full SLP Course Sequence Guide


Course Descriptions

SLP Course Descriptions

SLP 210 Introduction to Communication Disorders, 3 credits

This course is designed to give the student an overview of the speech-language pathology profession by describing the types of disorders that are likely to be encountered in a typical caseload. Additionally, the student is given basic information about the profession: typical work settings, certification and licensure requirements, and the profession’s Code of Ethics.

Fall only

SLP 215 Development Across the Lifespan, 3 credits

To understand what constitutes a delay or disorder of speech and/or language comprehension or production, the speech-language pathologist must understand the nature and sequence of normal speech and language development. This course is designed to address how humans typically develop speech and language abilities, both in terms of comprehension and production.

SLP 220 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing, 3 credits

This course covers anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanism, including nomenclature, respiration, phonation, articulation/resonance, the nervous system, and the auditory system. A laboratory is included to assist the student in learning the anatomy, utilizing models, charts, videotapes, and cadavers.

Fall only

SLP 230 Phonetics, 3 credits

Principles of phonetics and their application to speech is covered in this course. Classification of speech sounds according to various systems including, but not limited to, manner and place, distinctive features, and phonological processes. Exercises in phonetic transcription utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet will be provided.

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 230. Fall only

SLP 250 Speech and Hearing Science, 3 credits

The study of speech and hearing physiology, acoustic phonetics, and speech perception is covered in this course.

Spring only

SLP 260 Articulation, Phonology, and Language Disorders, 3 credits

This course includes an exploration of the processes related to developmental articulation, phonology, and language disorders from birth through adolescence. Instruction in the principles underlying modification of these disorders is provided.

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 230. Spring only

SLP 301 Literacy and SLP in the Schools, 3 credits

This course includes the establishment and maintenance of speech and hearing programs within various administrative organizations, particularly in public schools. Emphasis is placed on the individual educational plan (IEP) process including referral, assessment, evaluation, identification, and development of a meaningful IEP. Techniques of scheduling, record keeping, material and equipment selection, counseling, and behavior management are discussed. In addition, the development of coordinated professional and interdisciplinary procedures and issues of ethical practice and cultural diversity are addressed. This course also addresses the relationship between language and literacy, and the role of the school SLP in prevention, assessment, and treatment of literacy issues through consultative, collaborative and pull-out methods.

SLP 305 Observation and Clinical Procedures I, 2 credits

This course includes clinical procedures for working in various practicum settings, using diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, writing behavioral objectives, procedures for report writing, and practical experience with clinician-made and commercial materials. This course also provides direct clinical observation of the evaluation and rehabilitation of individuals with speech, language, and hearing problems. A minimum of 20 clock hours of observation will be required.

Spring only

SLP 310/512 Methods and Critical Consumerism in Research, 3 credits

A study of research design and statistical analysis as it pertains to communication disorders is covered in this course. Topics will include levels of measurement, single and group research designs, nonparametric and parametric statistics, and the organization and implementation of research from formulation of research questions through dissemination of results. The seminar will involve the critical review of representative samples of research in the speech-language pathology literature.

Spring only

SLP 325 Stuttering, Voice, and Cleft Palate, 3 credits

An introduction to the developmental, psychogenic, and organic bases for stuttering, voice disorders, and cleft palate is covered in this course. Instruction in principles underlying treatment of these disorders with emphasis on anatomical deviations and laryngeal dysfunction is provided.

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 220. Fall only

SLP 330 Introduction to Audiology, 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to theories of hearing. Students will be exposed to basic audiometric principles used in hearing measurement. Auditory tests include pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and electrophysiological measures used to assess hearing sensitivity in clients across the lifespan.

Spring only

SLP 350 Adult Communication Disorders, 3 credits

An overview of basic anatomy of those portions of the central nervous system that control swallowing and human communication will be provided. The course will prepare students for an advanced study of speech and language development and neurogenic communication disorders of children and adults.

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 220. Spring only

SLP 415 Observation and Clinical Procedures II, 2 credits

This course prepares students for the first clinical experience. Student will plan, implement, and evaluate at least one (1) therapy session with a client based on the information learned in class. A minimum of 5 clock hours of observation will be required.

Prerequisite SLP 305. Fall only

SLP 435 Communication Disorders in Autism, 3 credit

This course provides students with a working knowledge regarding speech-language disorders in autism. Foundation knowledge will be presented in understanding current research regarding speech-language issues in autism, including diagnostic language markers and speech, language, fluency and voice characteristics in autism. Students will complete coursework focusing on adaptation of diagnostic and treatment planning to the autistic population and identification and use of evidence-based treatment protocols related to the specific diagnosis of autism.

SLP 445 Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 3 credit

Anatomy, early development, and function of the central and peripheral nervous system will be covered in this course. There will be a focus on neurological structures important to communication which will form the basis of communication disorders encountered in a medical environment. Also covered will be information concerning the role of the speech-language pathologist in management of tracheostomy, ventilator dependent patients, and options to improve voice following laryngectomy.

SLP 450 Optional Clinic, 3 credits

This is an undergraduate in-house practicum assignment for exceptional students in the second semester of the junior year. This course includes writing lesson plans, reports, and case histories of a detailed nature for individuals or groups of persons who exhibit speech, language, or hearing problems. An experience in working with individuals or groups of persons who exhibit speech or hearing problems is included.

Prerequisite SLP 305, SLP 415. Spring only

SLP 500 Articulation and Phonological Disorders, 3 credits

An examination of normal and deviant articulatory acquisition and behavior will be covered. Presentation of major theoretical orientations and the therapeutic principles will be discussed.

Fall only

SLP 505 Clinic I (sec I-IV), 3 credits

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year of study. The student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students are learning in the academic coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

SLP 510 Fluency Disorders, 3 credits

Theories, assessment and treatment techniques for persons with fluency disorders across the lifespan will be covered.

Spring only

SLP 515 Hearing Seminar, 1 credit

Students will receive hands-on experiences in audiometric testing and audiological intervention within the scope of practice for speech-language pathology students.

SLP 525 Child Language Disorders, 3 credits

This course provides an overview and evaluation of the language skills of preschool and school aged children including metalinguistic and discourse development. Contemporary theory and practice in language assessment and intervention for children from birth through high school will be reviewed.
Spring only

SLP 530 Vocal and Velopharyngeal Disorders, 3 credits

The study of etiology, symptoms, and treatment strategies for a variety of vocal and velopharyngeal disorders will be covered.
Fall only

SLP 540 Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 3 credits

Assessment and intervention strategies and technology for individuals with severe communication impairments will be covered.
Summer only

SLP 545 Aphasia and Cognitive Communication Disorders, 3 credits

Neurological and psychological aspects of aphasia and other cognitive communication disorders will be covered. Assessment and intervention approaches will be discussed and evaluated.
Fall only

SLP 555 Diagnostic Clinic in Communication Disorders, 1 credit

Supervised practicum experience in performing in-depth diagnostic evaluations with individuals exhibiting any type of speech, hearing, or language dysfunction will be included. Students will gain experience in obtaining case history information, administering diagnostic tests, conferring with parents or their responsible party, and writing reports.
Corequisite SLP 560

SLP 560 Differential Diagnosis in Communication Disorders, 3 credits

This course covers an introduction to formal and informal procedures for evaluating and diagnosing speech and language disorders, selection of tests and techniques, validity and reliability of procedures, interview techniques appropriate to a case history, preparation of evaluation and case history reports, as well as preparation of management programs.

Corequisite SLP 555

SLP 565 Speech-language Pathology Seminar I, 1 credit

This course will cover the American Speech-language Pathology Code of Ethics, Licensure Handbook of Pennsylvania, clinical policies and procedures, clinical documentation, and clinical issues regarding client care.

Fall only

SLP 566 Speech-language Pathology Seminar II, 1 credit

This course will cover resume building, school and hospital issues in speech-language pathology, development of therapeutic intervention strategies and materials, and clinical issues regarding client care.

Spring only

SLP 575 Motor Speech Disorders, 3 credits

A study of the medical, physical, occupational, speech, language and hearing problems of the neuro-motorically impaired client will be covered. Assessment and therapy techniques are reviewed and evaluated.

Fall only

SLP 585 Speech-language Pathology Seminar III, 3 credits

This course may change from year to year. At present, interviewing and counseling skills related to speech and language disorders across the lifespan is taught in this course.

Spring only

SLP 590 Dysphagia, 3 credits

Information and training in the evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders throughout the lifespan is covered in this course.

Summer only

SLP 601 Summer Clinic I (sections I-IV), 3 credits

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year of study. The course is offered in the summer semester. The student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students learn in academic coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Summer only

SLP 602 Summer Clinic II (sections I-IV), 3 credits

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year of study. The course is offered in the summer semester and is typically taken after the student has completed SLP 505, SLP 605, or SLP 601. The student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students learn in academic coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Summer only

SLP 605 Clinic II (sec I-IV), 3 credits

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year of study. The course is usually taken after a student has completed SLP 505. The student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students learn in academic coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

SLP 610 Fieldwork I, 9 credits

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This off-campus practicum experience is to be taken in the student’s fifth year of study.

SLP 620 Fieldwork II, 9 credits

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This off-campus practicum experience is to be taken in the student’s fifth year of study. This practicum experience is to be taken in the student's fifth year of study. This course is typically taken after the student has completed SLP 610.

SLP 630 Fieldwork III, 6 credits

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This practicum is to be taken during the summer term following the student's fifth year of study and/or if all practicum requirements have not been met.

SLP 650 Professional Issues, 3 credits

A seminar devoted to issues pertinent to the field of speech-language pathology, including but not limited to pre-professional academic and practicum requirements, accreditation standards, ASHA practice policies and guidelines, legislative and regulatory policies, business practices, reimbursement issues, certification requirements, specialty recognition, licensure requirements, and professional ethics.

Fall only

SLP 660 Comprehensive Seminar In Communicative Disorders, 3 credits

This a 3 credit hour graduate level course that provides extensive study that covers all aspects of the Speech-Language Pathology Program from undergraduate coursework through graduate coursework. The course is designed to cover all nine ASHA areas of specialty, including articulation/phonological disorders, child language disorders, adult language/neurological disorders, voice disorders, fluency disorders, augmentative and alternative communication, dysphagia, research methods, and cultural aspects of communication disorders. The course also covers all 7 areas of the PRAXIS SLP, including, basic human communication, phonological and language disorders, speech disorders, neurogenic disorders, audiology/hearing, clinical management, professional issues, psychometrics, and research.

SLP 680 Thesis Option, 3 credits

Independent design and implementation of a research study under the supervision of a faculty member.

Curriculum Objectives

Curriculum Objectives

To ensure that graduates of the Speech-Language Pathology program will be prepared for their professional roles and responsibilities, the following are the program's curriculum objectives. Upon successful completion of the Speech-Language Pathology program, graduates will be able to:

  1. Provide prevention, screening, consultation, assessment and diagnosis, treatment, intervention, management, counseling, and follow-up services for disorders of:
    1. speech (i.e., articulation, fluency, resonance, and voice including aeromechanical components of respiration).
    2. language (i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatic/social aspects of communication) including comprehension and expression in oral, written, graphic, and manual modalities; language processing; preliteracy and language-based literacy skills, including phonological awareness.
    3. swallowing or other upper aerodigestive functions such as infant feeding and aeromechanical events (evaluation of esophageal function is for the purpose of referral to medical professionals));
    4. cognitive aspects of communication (e.g., attention, memory, problem solving, executive functions).
    5. sensory awareness related to communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions.
  2. Establish augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques and strategies including developing, selecting, and prescribing of such systems and devices (e.g., speech generating devices).
  3. Provide services to individuals with hearing loss and their families/caregivers (e.g., auditory training; speech reading; speech and language intervention secondary to hearing loss).
  4. Screen hearing of individuals who can participate in conventional pure-tone air conduction methods, as well as screening for middle ear pathology through screening tympanometry for the purpose of referral of individuals for further evaluation and management.
  5. Use instrumentation (e.g., videofluoroscopy, EMG, nasendoscopy, stroboscopy, computer technology) to observe, collect data, and measure parameters of communication and swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions in accordance with the principles of evidence-based practice.
  6. Select, fit, and establish effective use of prosthetic/adaptive devices for communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions (e.g., tracheoesophageal prostheses, speaking valves, electrolarynges). This does not include sensory devices used by individuals with hearing loss or other auditory perceptual deficits.
  7. Collaborate in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders and providing intervention where there is evidence of speech, language, and/or other cognitive-communication disorders.
  8. Educate and counsel individuals, families, co-workers, educators, and other persons in the community regarding acceptance, adaptation, and decision making about communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive concerns.
  9. Advocate for individuals through community awareness, education, and training programs to promote and facilitate access to full participation in communication, including the elimination of societal barriers.
  10. Collaborate with and provide referrals and information to audiologists, educators, and other health professionals as individual needs dictate.
  11. Address behaviors (e.g., perseverative or disruptive actions) and environments (e.g., seating, positioning for swallowing safety or attention, communication opportunities) that affect communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions.
  12. Provide services to modify or enhance communication performance (e.g., accent modification, transgendered voice, care and improvement of the professional voice, personal/professional communication effectiveness).
  13. Recognize the need to provide and appropriately accommodate diagnostic and treatment services to individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds and adjust treatment and assessment services accordingly.
  14. Be critical consumers of professional literature.
  15. Accept responsibility for service to one's fellow human beings.

The academic curriculum, practicum experiences, research requirement, and service activity requirements that students must complete in this program have been designed and will be implemented in a way that will ensure that graduates meet or exceed these objectives. The net result of the student's educational experience in this program will be a well-prepared, service-oriented, competent professional who is fully prepared and eligible for ASHA certification as a speech-language pathologist.

Clinical Curriculum

Clinical Curriculum

College of Health Sciences Clinical Education Policies

As part of the undergraduate curriculum, the student will be expected to earn a minimum of 25 clock hours of supervised observation before they begin any clinical practicum. Undergraduate transfers, students possessing a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than communication sciences and disorders and students who have not completed their observation hours must complete their 25 clock hours of observation before beginning graduate clinical work. The Speech-Language Pathology program at Misericordia University is unique because students may complete one semester of undergraduate clinic before beginning the master's coursework. These students are given one or two clients to work with during the semester before they start their graduate coursework and clinic.

The clinical component of the Speech-Language Pathology program is integrally tied to the academic component. The Speech-Language Pathology program's philosophy is that students should have as much of the academic preparation completed as possible so that they can integrate and use that information effectively when conducting assessment or intervention with persons having speech and/or language disorders. All practicum experiences are intended to allow students to gain practical experience with children and adults exhibiting speech and/or language disorders in a variety of settings, including public schools, outpatient facilities, private practices, rehabilitation centers, acute care facilities, hospitals, and long-term care facilities. The graduate clinical curriculum is sequenced in such a way that students work towards completion of most of their academic coursework within the first graduate year, as well as completing two in-house treatment clinics and one diagnostic clinic. Students will be able to earn between 50 to 75 clock hours of practicum over the course of these in-house clinics.

The second year of graduate study is primarily devoted to external clinical practicum placements. Most students will not need to enroll in SLP 630 Fieldwork III as their practicum experiences in SLP 610 Fieldwork I and SLP 620 Fieldwork II should be sufficient to allow them to complete all practicum requirements for ASHA certification. Those students who do not meet the Department's and ASHA's certification standards related to clinical practicum upon completion of SLP 620 will be required to enroll in SLP 630 to meet the appropriate standards.

Students who enter the master's program with clinical clock hours earned at the undergraduate level and students who transfer from a graduate program at another institution of higher education who have earned practicum clock hours will be allowed to transfer those clock hours as long as they were obtained at an accredited institution and were earned under ASHA's standards for clinical practicum. The academic semester or quarter hour credit for practicum, however, will not be transferred to count toward the academic standards.

By the time a student graduates with a master's degree from the program, he or she will have met all practicum requirements for professional certification. This includes a minimum of 400 clock hours of appropriate clinical experience, with a minimum of 25 clock hours of the 400 being obtained in clinical observation.

The practicum experiences will be varied both in terms of clinical settings to which students are assigned, and the diversity of communication disorders that the student will encounter. The net result of all clinical experiences will be a well-prepared, rounded, competent clinician who will be ready to take his or her place in the professional world.

(updated May 2014)

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