Full-Time Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN)


The Misericordia University Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree provides an education that shares and embraces the University values of service, mercy, justice and hospitality. Graduates are prepared to enter the workforce as professionals who assume an active and vital role as a member of the multidisciplinary health care team in the planning, provision, and evaluation of ethical, safe and humanistic care in a rapidly expanding health care technological system.

Highlights

  • Baccalaureate and Master of Science in Nursing programs accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) through 2023.

  • The oldest nursing program in Luzerne County and the largest discipline within the College of Health Sciences.

  • The preferred online RN to BSN educational provider for Geisinger Wyoming Valley for Luzerne County.

  • Recipient of the 2012 Innovation in Professional Nursing Education Award for Small Schools from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) for outstanding work to re-envision traditional models for nursing education and leading programmatic change.

  • Graduates of the bachelor of science in nursing degree program have achieved the following pass rates for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses(NCLEX-RN): 98.31% in 2012, 98.08% in 2013, 78.18% in 2014, 92.86% in 2015 and 95.6% in 2016.
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education


Admissions requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Successful freshman applicants to Misericordia University's Nursing program will typically have a minimum grade point average of 2.8 and a combined SAT score of 960 (math and critical reading) for students who took the SAT prior to March 5, 2016, or 1040 for students who took the SAT after March 5, 2016; in lieu of the SAT, ACT results may also be presented reflecting a minimum 21 ACT composite score. They will also have taken 1 year of high school chemistry, biology, and math (including 1 semester of algebra) all with a minimum grade of "C".

Please note the above listed requirements are general, and that each application is looked at thoroughly, taking into account individual grades, academic rigor, and other factors.

* The above new SAT standards are the direct equivalent of the prior standard for the old test, as listed in the selection requirements at the link below:

Selection, Advancement and Graduation

Online application

Full-Time Second-Degree Day Option

Individuals entering the second degree option do not need to meet the core curriculum requirements of the university.

The total number of credits required for graduation (126 credits) includes transferred core, nursing prerequisite courses (21 credits) and credits required in the nursing major (54 credits).

In addition, six graduate credits can be earned while completing the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The majority of the prerequisite courses must be completed prior to starting the nursing courses in the full-time program option. A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required to transfer into the nursing program.

Pre requisites include: Anatomy and Physiology I & II, Bacteriology, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, and Statistics.

Full-Time Second Degree Day Option Course Sequence

Sophomore Year
First SemesterCredits
NSG 201 Foundations Essential to Professional Nursing Practice3
NSG 300 Conceptual Basis of Professional Nursing2
Total Credits5
Junior Year
Second SemesterCreditsThird SemesterCredits
NSG 301 FHP Adult I6NSG 303 FHP Adult II6
NSG 302 FHP Psych-mental Health4NSG 304 FHP Pediatric Nursing4
NSG 305 Physical Assessment3NSG 320 Principles of Pharmacology3
Total Credits13Total Credits13
Senior Year
Fourth SemesterCreditsFifth SemesterCredits
NSG 401 FHP Adult III5NSG 403 FHP Aggregates and Populations3
NSG 402 FHP Child Bearing and Family4NSG 404 FHP Adult IV5
NSG 410W Nursing Research for Evidence Based Practice3NSG 405 Baccalaureate Capstone3
GRAD Elective3GRAD Elective3
Total Credits12-15Total Credits11-14

Nursing Scholarships and Awards

Nursing Scholarships

Sharon Drasnin Scholarship
Awarded annually to the nursing student with the highest grade point average at the completion of the junior Year.

Edith Elliot Scholarship
Awarded annually to female full-time undergraduate nursing students. There are 25- 30 Edith Elliot Scholarships awarded annually.

Victoria Cadawalder Scholarship
Awarded annually to one academically able nontraditional full-time undergraduate nursing student.

Jean Tyrell Weinburg Scholarship
This award is offered annually to an undergraduate incoming freshman nursing student.

Jennie Benedetti Scholarship
Awarded annually to a Native of Greater Wilkes-Barre Area. The student must be in an undergraduate nursing or medical major.

Undergraduate Nursing Awards

The following awards are available for students who are graduating from the undergraduate, registered nurse (RN) and graduate nursing programs:

  1. The Sister Mary Kateri Dowart Award is an award that is conferred annually to a graduating undergraduate nursing student. Criteria include:
    1. QPA above 3.0
    2. Demonstrated service to the Nursing Department, the College and the Community
    3. Membership in the National Student Nurses Association
    4. Endorsement by faculty
  2. The M. Bernadette Hogan Award is an award that is conferred annually to a graduating RN to BSN student who exemplifies outstanding service and leadership to the profession of nursing and the community.
  3. The Clinical Excellence Award is an award that is given to an undergraduate nursing student whose GPA is greater than 3.0 and who is judged by faculty to administer superior nursing skills in clinical practice.
  4. The John Glawe Award for Caring and Compassion in Nursing is an award that is conferred annually to a BSN student who exemplifies caring and compassion with clients on the clinical unit.
  5. Graduating seniors in nursing are also eligible for College conferred awards.

International Study Opportunities

Nursing majors have an option to study away in the spring of their sophomore year.


Students will need to take pre-requisites of Anatomy and Physiology I, Microbiology, and Nutrition prior to the study away experience. This provides students freedom to select from a variety of study away options.


Dr. Cynthia Mailloux at Tanzanian study abroad trip


Dr. Cindy Mailloux participated in a service trip through Global Health and Community Engagement in East Africa.

Nursing Student Clubs and Organizations

Nursing students at Misericordia University are active in a variety of student organizations and activities that foster professional development and a commitment to service.

Student Nurses' Association of Pennsylvania (SNAP)


All nursing students are active participants in SNAP, through membership in the University chapter.

SNAP is a student run organization that represents over 1,800 students from more than 50 nursing schools within Pennsylvania. SNAP is an affiliate of the National Student Nurses' Association(NSNA).

The purposes of this organization are: to contribute to nursing education, in order to provide for the highest quality care; to provide programs representative of fundamental and current professional interests and concerns; and to aid in the development of the whole person and his/her professional role and responsibility for the health care of all people (NSNA Bylaws, 1992). All matriculated students in the nursing major are eligible for membership in the Misericordia University Chapter of SNAP .


Sigma Theta Tau

Misericordia University Sigma Theta Tau 2014

Misericordia University's Nursing Department is represented by the Theta Phi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, the international honor society for nursing. Membership in the society is awarded to bachelor's, master's and doctoral nursing students who achieve high scholastic averages, and to graduates of nursing programs who have made outstanding contributions to nursing.

To be nominated for membership in the Theta Phi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, undergraduate nursing candidates must have completed at least on half of the nursing curriculum, have at least a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale, and be in the upper 35% of his/her graduating class. The student must also demonstrate leadership in nursing at Misericordia University and in the community.

Graduate nursing candidates must have completed one fourth of the nursing curriculum and achieved a 3.5 grade point average.

Sigma Theta Tau International, and the Theta Phi Chapter, encourage and actively support professional development and promote nursing scholarship, leadership, creativity and commitment to nursing. Theta Phi conducts many activities and events aimed at members.

Nurse Residency Program

Misericordia University supports Geisinger Wyoming Valley on Nurse Residency Program

DALLAS, Pa. – Geisinger Northeast and the Department of Nursing at Misericordia University are collaborating on a nurse residency program to be delivered on the Dallas campus. This program provides new registered nurses hired at Geisinger Northeast with additional education, mentoring and support as they transition from graduate nurses to professional registered nurses.

The Institute on Medicine recommends nurse residency programs as an important component in developing nurses in the workplace. Geisinger selected Misericordia University as its partner in Luzerne County for the one-year residency program that provides 12 monthly sessions to newly hired Geisinger Northeast employees. This program was established to provide future nurses for excellence and a better educated workforce in the clinical setting. The program will transition new graduates into competent providers of care.

The mentoring and education includes additional training in the simulation laboratory as well as classroom instruction that aids in professional development, workplace leadership, team building, and more. The program coordinators for the residency program are Nina Flannigan PhD, GNP-BC, PMH-CS and Kim Caruso MSN, RN.

Nurse Residency Program

Nurse Residency Program

Geisinger Northeast and the Department of Nursing at Misericordia University are collaborating on a nurse residency program on campus for newly hired nurses at Geisinger Northeast.Participating in a recent session on campus, seated from left, are Bridget Fox, RN; Maryann Cortese-Rubino, MS, RN, associate VP of nursing services, Geisinger Northeast; Dr. Nina Flanagan, nurse residency program coordinator, Geisinger Northeast, and Jennifer Everding, RN; standing, Audrey Cunfer, MSN, RN, nursing laboratories manager, Misericordia University; Kimberly Caruso, RN, nurse residency coordinator, Geisinger Northeast; Kaylin Ahearn, RN; Matthew Butler, RN; Brandi Burke, RN; Sarah Zulkoski, RN, and Dr. Cynthia Mailloux, professor and chair, Misericordia University.

Clinical Education Policies

Clinical Education Requirements
Accepted students must submit the following documentation prior to the start of the program:

  • FBI Background Check
  • State Background Check
  • Child Abuse Clearance
  • Health Physical to include documentation of immunizations, Tuberculin test and Hepatitis B vaccination (form provided)
  • CPR certification for health care providers through the American Heart Association, Red Cross or an organization approved by the program
  • Proof of Medical Insurance Coverage
  • HIPAA education

Individual clinical sites may require additional documentation, such as drug screening which varies in the time frame of being tested and entering the clinical setting; thus, the clinical coordinator will inform you as to when to have the test done. Clinical education requirements are at the expense of the student.

College of Health Sciences Clinical Education Policies
(reviewed/revised 6/2015)

Full-Time BS in Nursing Course Sequence

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
Core3English Core

3
PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology3Fine Arts Core3
History/Political Science Core

3

History/Political Science Core

3
ENG 151University Writing Seminar3PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy3
SOC 101 Comparative Sociology3PSY 275 Child/Adolescent Psychology3
Total Credits15Total Credits15
Sophomore Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology4BIO 212 Anatomy & Physiology II4
BIO 228 Introduction to Microbiology4NSG 201 Foundations of Nursing3
MTH Core - Math Bank I3NSG 300 Conceptual Basis of Professional Nursing2
HP 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition3MTH 115 Statistics3
Philosophy Core3RLS 104 World Religions3
Total Credits17Total Credits15
Junior Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
NSG 301 FHP Adult I6NSG 320 Principles of Pharmacology3
NSG 302 FHP Psych-mental Health4NSG 303 FHP Adult II6
NSG 305 Physical Assessment3NSG 304 FHP Pediatric Nursing4
FA Core3RLS Core3




Total Credits16Total Credits16
Senior Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
NSG 410W Nursing Research for Evidence Based Practice3NSG 403 FHP Aggregates and Populations3
NSG 401 FHP Adult III5NSG 404 FHP Adult IV5
NSG 402 FHP Child-bearing and Family4NSG 405 Baccalaureate Capstone3
Free elective3Free elective3


Free elective3
Total Credits15Total Credits17
Total required for graduation: 126 credits

Course Descriptions

NSG 201 Foundations of Nursing, 3 credits

This course emphasizes basic nursing concepts and the recognition of select functional health patterns such as activity-exercise, nutritional-metabolic, elimination, and sleep-rest functional health patterns, basic theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are taught and implemented within a nursing practice framework. Competencies in cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills are developed and refined in clinical practice settings and/or simulated clinical situations.

(2 credits lecture and 1 credit clinical/laboratory)

Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 227, PSY 275, HP 241; Prerequisite/Co-requisite: BIO 212

NSG 300 Concepts of Nursing, 2 credits

This course presents an overview of major health professions, with a focus on the profession of nursing. The emphasis in this course is on assisting the student to develop a theoretical base for professional nursing practice based on Gordon's functional health patterns. Students are introduced to the nursing metaparadigm, nursing theorists, and the nursing process as a foundation for baccalaureate nursing practice.

Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 227,PSY 275, HP 241; Prerequisites/Co-requisites: BIO 212, NSG 201

NSG 301 Functional Health Patterns Adults I, 6 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including coping and stress tolerance; cognitive-perceptual; nutritional/metabolic; activity and exercise; and elimination. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the autonomic nervous, integumentary, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal systems, in addition to pain and infectious disease as health problems of adults. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 3 credits clinical/laboratory)

Prerequisite: NSG 201; Prerequisite/Co-requisite: NSG 300

NSG 302 Functional Health Patterns Psychiatric Nursing, 4 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns of clients with psychiatric-mental health problems, including health perception/health management; cognitive-perceptual; sleep-rest; self perception/self concept; role-relationship; sexuality-reproductive; value-belief; and coping/stress tolerance. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for clients with acute and chronic mental health disorders. Emphasis is placed on psychobiology, psychiatric genetics, and psychosocial therapeutic modalities used in the nursing care of adults and children with psychiatric disorders. Students apply principles of psychopharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to clients in the psychiatric setting. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical)

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: NSG 201

NSG 303 Functional Health Patterns Adults II, 6 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including cognitive-perceptual; nutritional/metabolic; activity and exercise. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the metabolic, cardiovascular, sensory, autoimmune, and respiratory problems of adults. Students will work in a variety of settings including caring for patients in the perioperative period. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 3 credits clinical/laboratory)

Prerequisites: NSG 201, NSG 301

NSG 304 Functional Health Patterns Pediatrics, 4 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns in children from infancy through young adulthood. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for pediatric clients and their families with acute and chronic illness in a variety of pediatric settings. Emphasis is placed on normal growth and development. Students examine the applications of current research evidence, principles of pharmacology, as well as legal and ethical issues influencing the planning and delivery of nursing care to pediatric clients and their families. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical/laboratory)

Prerequisites: NSG 300, NSG 301

NSG 305 Physical Assessment, 3 credits

This course examines techniques used by nurses in the ongoing assessment of the health status of patients. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, obtaining health histories, and physical assessment techniques used across the lifespan. (2 credits lecture and 1 credit laboratory)

NSG 320 Principles of Pharmacology, 3 credits

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge and understanding of essential principles of pharmacology. The course will focus on therapeutic classifications; characteristic drug groups; physiologic influences on drug effects; principles of therapy; drug interactions; and legal, ethical, and economic issues of drug therapy.

Prerequisite: NSG 201

NSG 325 Informatics for Healthcare Professionals, 3 credits

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of healthcare informatics. This course will examine computer technology and selected computer applications, including emerging technology for safe and effective patient care. Information systems that provide data about quality improvement and required regulatory reporting through information systems are discussed. An overview of the variety of technologies that facilitate clinical care, including patient monitoring systems, medication administration systems, and other technologies to support patient care is provided. Emphasis is placed on maintaining an attitude of openness to innovation and continual learning, as information systems and patient care technologies are constantly changing. The use of informatics in professional practice, education, research, and administration will be explored, along with the impact of informatics on healthcare delivery systems.

NSG 397A Professional Nursing Concepts and Theories, 3 credits

This course focuses on concepts basic to the development of professional practitioners. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, nursing theories, and the re-socialization of the professional nursing role. Theoretical and applied concepts for professional practice, the changing health care system, an introduction to healthcare finance, information technology, and professional practice strategies, including wellness and health promotion across the lifespan are explored.

Prerequisite: RN status

NSG 398A Health Assessment Across the Lifespan, 3 credits

This course focuses on concepts integral to the development of professional nursing practice. Culturally-competent techniques used by nurses in the ongoing assessment of the health status of patients are examined. Emphasis is placed on utilizing interviewing skills, obtaining health histories, and physical assessment techniques used across the lifespan. techniques used by registered nurses in the ongoing assessment of the health status of clients. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, obtaining health histories, and physical assessment techniques used across the lifespan.

Prerequisites: RN status

NSG 401 Functional Health Patterns Adults III, 5 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including coping and stress tolerance; cognitive-perceptual; health perception-health management, nutritional/metabolic; activity and exercise; and elimination. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on altered cellular proliferation, and alterations in endocrine, neurologic, oncology, renal and hepatic function as health problems of adults. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 3 credits clinical)

Prerequisites: NSG 303, NSG 305, NSG 320

NSG 402 Functional Health Patterns Childbearing, 4 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing, basic and psychosocial sciences and focuses on sexuality and reproductive functional health patterns of women and their families to achieve a positive pregnancy outcome and safe fetal environment. Emphasis is placed on normal, as well as, abnormal processes of childbirth to provide students with the knowledge and basic obstetrical skills to care for women, newborns, and families experiencing a normal obstetrical course and those experiencing complications. Students examine human genetics, the application of current research evidence, principles of pharmacology, and legal/ethical issues influencing the planning and delivery of nursing care to pregnant women, newborns, and families. In the clinical component of the course, emphasis is placed on the role of the professional nurse working in the obstetrical specialty, the application of the nursing process in providing nursing care to pregnant women, newborns, and families and the enhancement of critical thinking skills, therapeutic nursing interventions, select pharmacotherapies, effective communication and interpersonal skills. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical)

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: NSG 303, NSG 304, NSG 305

NSG 403 Functional Health Patterns in Populations, 3 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores alterations in functional health patterns, including self-perception, self-concept; sexuality-reproductive; coping-stress tolerance; health perception-health management, value-belief; cognitive-perceptual, and role relationship. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations. Emphasis is placed on population-centered health care in the community. The values of public health nursing concepts are embedded within the implementation of community-oriented nursing practice. In the clinical component of the course, nursing practice takes place in a variety of public settings. Perspectives in global health care are considered in relation to a population-based approach and its major health problems and burdens of disease. Students examine the application of current research evidence, principles of pharmacology, as well as legal and ethical issues influencing the planning and delivery of health care to individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations. The role of the nurse as community leader is emphasized. (2 credits lecture and 1 credit clinical)

Prerequisites: NSG 303

NSG 404 Functional Health Patterns Adults IV, 5 credits

This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns including, nutritional/metabolic; activity-exercise, elimination, cognitive-perceptual, health perception-health management pattern, coping and stress tolerance, and value-belief pattern.. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the normal aging process and pathophysiologic changes of adults with complex health problems and critical alterations in cardiovascular, integumentary, hematological, and multi-system dysfunction. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical)

Prerequisites: NSG 401, NSG 402 Corequisite: NSG 403

NSG 405 Baccalaureate Capstone, 3 credits

This capstone course is focused on facilitating the transition from the role of student to the role of the professional nurse in the contemporary health care environment. Strategies for success on the national licensing examination are designed and implemented. Students are introduced to leadership and management concepts as they apply to professional practice and the health care milieu. Critical analysis of legal, ethical, and diversity issues in health care is emphasized.

Prerequisites: NSG 401, NSG 402,

NSG 410W Nursing Research for Evidence Based Practice, 3 credits

This introductory course is designed to prepare students to become consumers of research who critically evaluate and base care on evidence. Emphasis is placed on the components of the quantitative and qualitative research processes, the concepts and terms associated with these processes, and the competencies necessary to read, evaluate, and interpret research findings for practice. Building on critical thinking skills, this course will expand students' knowledge by assisting them to develop and use principles of evidence based healthcare to address problems in professional practice.

Prerequisite: MTH 115

NSG 413 Cooperative Education in Nursing Leadership, 1-8 credits

This is a variable credit course which allows the working Registered Nurse the opportunity to combine academic study with work experience to further explore leadership concepts. Credits are dependent on number of hours to be completed, and assignments are adjusted accordingly.

Prerequisites: Registered Nurse status, NSG 320, NSG 325, NSG 397A, NSG 398A

NSG 460A Care of Aggregates, Communities and Populations, 2 credits

This course explores the professional community/public health nurse’s role in exploring alterations in functional health patterns of individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations, including alterations in self-perception, self-concept, sexuality-reproductive health, coping-stress tolerance, health perception-health management, value-belief and role relationship, and cognitive-perceptual concerns. Selected nursing theories, the nursing process, and principles of leadership and management are applied to models for health planning and population-focused practice. Basic concepts of epidemiology are presented and applied to community health problems and national initiatives, including disaster-preparedness, culturally-competent care, and the legal and ethical issues influencing the planning and delivery of care to individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations.

Prerequisites: RN Status; NSG 397A, 398A; Co-requisite NSG 465A

NSG 465A Clinical Application of Aggregates, Communities and Populations, 2 credits

This course focuses upon the clinical application of community-oriented/public health nursing concepts. Students, under the supervision of a designated preceptor in a community/public health practice setting, will apply theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles as they work with aggregates in the community to implement interventions aimed at achieving positive health outcomes. Nursing care delivery systems in the community that promote health and prevent illness in population groups will be explored. The role of the professional nurse as community leader is emphasized.

Co-requisite: Registered Nurse status, NSG 460A

NSG 480 Special Topics in Nursing, 1-3 credits

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue the investigation of selected topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration information.

NSG 498 Critical Thinking and Clinical Judgement, 1 credit

This course synthesizes key concepts necessary for professional nursing practice. The use of critical thinking is applied to problem solving in the delivery of nursing care to patients with complex illness. Students will review test taking strategies, questions, and rational for selection of answer(s). This course is designed to improve test taking skills, apply methods of critical thinking, clinical problem solving and decision-making in addressing major components of the NCLEX RN.

(First offered Spring 2015. Approved 11/14/2014)

NSG 499 Issues and Trends in Professional Practice, 3 credits

This course examines issues and trends in professional nursing practice. Students will analyze the impact of legal, ethical and public policy dimensions as they relate to health care in general and nursing specifically. Emphasis will be on examination of current issues in these areas. Current trends and issues in health care will provide a framework for analyzing the legal, ethical and public policy aspects of the health care system.

Prerequisite: RN Status

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