Medical Imaging (Radiography)

The Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Program at Misericordia University is rooted in the Charisms set forth by Catherine McAuley and the Sisters of Mercy to provide and promote mercy, service, justice, and hospitality.

Overview and Highlights






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Mission

The mission of the Medical Imaging Program is to graduate baccalaureate level professionals who are educationally prepared to successfully demonstrate clinical competence, professional behavior, communication and critical thinking skills to function as a member of the health care team.

Students in the Medical Imaging Program receive a liberal arts education that will prepare them for a career in the field of medical imaging, namely, the practical application of ionizing radiation in a variety of settings, including off-campus clinical placements as well as laboratory facilities on-campus.

Accreditation

Misericordia University's Medical Imaging Program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT): 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182 (312.704.5300), mail@jrcert.org, and the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Re-accreditation was awarded by the JRCERT in 2015. The JRCERT is the only agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education for the accreditation of educational programs in radiography, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance and medical dosimetry. View the JRCERT Standards for an Accredited Education Program.

Program Effectiveness Data

As required by our accrediting agency, The Joint Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (J.R.C.E.R.T.), in Standards for an Accredited Educational Program in Radiography, Standard 5.2,"Makes available to the general public program effectiveness data (credentialing examination pass rate, job placement rate, and program completion rate) on an annual basis". The Program Effectiveness Data may be found at: www.jrcert.org.

Credentialing examination pass rate is defined by the J.R.C.E.R.T., on p. 59 of the Standards as: "the number of graduates who pass, on first attempt, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (A.R.R.T.) certification examination...". Per the J.R.C.E.R.T. Standards, p. 59, "Five year average credentialing examination pass rate of not less than 75 percent at first attempt". Five year average (May 2012-December 2016) = 94.2% pass rate on first attempt of A.R.R.T. exam (115/122 first-time test takers passed).

5 Year History (1/2012 - 12/2016)

Class of: Credentialing Examination Pass Rate
May 201290.9% (10/11 first-time test takers)
December 2012100% (13/13 first-time test-takers)
May 2013100% (10/10 first-time test-takers)
December 201380% (8/10 first-time test-takers)
May 2014100% (16/16 first-time test-takers)
December 2014100% (11/11 first-time test-takers)
May 2015100% (12/12 first-time test-takers)
December 2015100% (3/3 first-time test-takers)
May 201687% (23/26 first-time test-takers)
December 201690% (9/10 first-time test-takers)
5 Year Average (1/2012-12/2016):94.2% (115/122 first-time test-takers)


Job Placement Rate is defined by the J.R.C.E.R.T. on p. 59 as "the number of graduates employed in the radiologic sciences compared to the number of graduates actively seeking employment in the radiologic sciences."

The J.R.C.E.R.T. requires a "Five year average job placement rate of not less than 75 percent within twelve months of graduation."

Class of: Job Placement Rate
2016100% (15/15)
2015 100% (12/12)
201492.9% (13/14)
2013 90.5% (19/21)
2012 81.8% (9/11)
5 year average: 93.2% (68/73 as of May 2016)

Program completion rates (PCR), as per the J.R.C.E.R.T. Standards on p. 59, is calculated by: "… dividing the number of students who complete the program within a cohort by the number who enrolled in the cohort initially and subsequently".

Class of: Program Completion Rate (PCR)
201626/39 = 66.7% who began 4 year program completed in 6 years
(32 began in Fall 2012, 7 transferred in Fall 2013, 39 total students over 4 years, and 26 graduated December 2015/May 2016)


Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

The Medical Imaging Program, with continuing affirmation of the mission of Misericordia University, will strive to fulfill the following goals and student learning outcomes:


Goal 1. Clinical Performance and Competence

Students will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to function as an entry-level radiographer.

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of proper positioning.
  2. The student will demonstrate proper exposure factor selection.
  3. The student will apply appropriate radiation protection measures.
  4. The student will demonstrate technical competence.
  5. The student will demonstrate optimal patient care.
Goal 2. Critical Thinking

Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills.

  1. The student will evaluate images effectively.
  2. The student will adapt knowledge to non-routine situations.
  3. The student will formulate conclusions/analysis of data for lab experiments.
Goal 3. Communication

Students will demonstrate effective communication skills.

  1. The student will demonstrate effective written communication skills.
  2. The student will demonstrate effective oral communication skills.
  3. The students will demonstrate information literacy.

Goal 4. Professionalism

Students/graduates will demonstrate professionalism.
  1. Students will demonstrate professional behavior.
  2. Students will demonstrate effective interpersonal skills.

Goal 5. Overall Program Effectiveness

The program will graduate competent, employable, entry level radiologic technologists in a timely manner.

  1. Graduates indicate satisfaction with their education received.
  2. Graduates are capable of successful completion of the primary A.R.R.T. exam in Radiography on the first attempt.
  3. Students indicate the ability to to obtain employment in the radiology profession.
  4. Successfully complete the Senior Assessment Test in MI 415.
  5. Employers demonstrate satisfaction with program graduates.
  6. Successfully complete the program.

In addition to the overall sustained goals of the program, yearly goals are developed by the full-time faculty for each academic year. The faculty review the proposed goals each May following the year in which they were implemented. Assessment is determined regarding attainment of the goals and a report to the college dean and vice-president of academic affairs is prepared. These may be found in the office of the department chair of Medical Imaging labeled "Annual Report".

Medical Imaging Program Options and Curriculum

Misericordia University provides qualified students with the opportunity to pursue program options that reflect the diversity of career paths in Medical Imaging. All of the curricula prepare students to be radiographers, and no matter what option is chosen, students at the same level in the program will be enrolled in the same Medical Imaging courses.

Option 1: General Program
This curriculum provides the same solid education as the others, but allows for more flexibility to pursue other areas of interest through free electives. View the medical imaging major curriculum guide.

Option 2: Minor in Management
This curriculum provides students with a strong background in the skills and theory necessary for supervisory or administrative positions. View the Medical Imaging with a minor in Management curriculum guide.

Option 3: B.S. Medical Imaging/M.S. Organizational Management (5 year)
This option prepares students with the knowledge and skills to function in management roles within the Radiography field. Students interested in the program can choose from three specializations: management, health care management, or human resource management.
Regardless of the specialization chosen, all tracks require the same 12 credits in OM courses to be taken during the undergraduate portion of the Medical Imaging major. View the B.S. Medical Imaging/M.S. Organizational Management curriculum guide.

Option 4: Medical Imaging Major, Combined Certificate Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Students may complete both the B.S. in medical imaging and the DMS Certificate in less than 5 academic years following this sequence. View the Medical Imaging Major with a combined Certificate in Diagnostic Medical Sonography curriculum guide.

Course Descriptions

MI 100 Introduction to Medical Imaging, 2 credits

This introduction to the medical imaging profession includes the historical development as well as specialties within the fields, organizational structure of hospital departments, and opportunities for professional growth. The profession is examined in order to assist the student in making a commitment to pursue this field. Lecture: 2 hours.

Fall, Spring (as needed)

MI 106 Medical Terminology, 1 credit

Anatomical names of bones and organs of the body and other descriptive terms and their common abbreviations; prefixes and suffixes, proper usage, spelling, and interpretation of terms. Lecture: 1 hour

Fall (online); Spring (online, as needed)

MI 125/125L Principles of Radiographic Exposure and Processing I (Lab), 3 credits

Elements of x-ray production. Emphasis on factors affecting production of an acceptable diagnostic radiograph: contrast, density, recorded detail, and visibility of detail.

Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall only

MI 126/126L Principles of Radiographic Exposure and Processing II (Lab), 2 credits

This course is a continuation of MI 125/125L. Further study of theories and factors affecting production of a quality image, inclusive of processing.
Lecture: 1.5 hours Laboratory: 1 hour

Prerequisite: MI 125 Spring only

MI 140 Clinical Experience I, 2 credits

Orientation to the clinical setting including rotations through out-patient facilities and operating room within the hospital. Equipment familiarization, application of theoretical principles through examination of patients under direct supervision. Four evening rotations: 3-10 pm. within the semester. 16 hours per week.

Prerequisites: MI 203/703, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. HIPAA education. Spring only

MI 160 Clinical Experience II, 2 credits

Continuation of MI 140. Experience in perfecting the application of ionizing radiation under supervision. Clinical experience in a hospital setting including diagnostic/fluoroscopic, portable and operating room rotations in addition to evening hours, weekend hours, and outpatient rotation. Five evening rotations (3-10 pm.) plus one weekend (Saturday and Sunday day shift). 40 hours per weeks.

Prerequisites: MI 140, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Summer Term A (May–June, 6 weeks)

MI 200 Patient Care, 2 credits

This course will provide the student with an overview of the foundations in radiography and the practitioner's role in the health care delivery system. The professional responsibilities of the radiographer will be examined and discussed. Communication skills and professional conduct of the radiographer in the clinical setting will also be introduced. Basic concepts of patient care, physical and physiological needs of the patient, and routine and emergency patient care will be described. Human diversity in health care will be discussed and its impact in the treatment of patients.

Fall only

MI 201/201L Advanced Patient Care, 2 credits

Advanced patient care skills are essential elements of providing high-quality patient care in medical imaging. Building on Patient Care, this course utilizes a combination of lecture and lab to develop skills in patient care. Basic concepts of patient education and assessment, pharmacology, venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents are covered.

Prerequisite: MI 200. Spring only.

MI 203/203L Radiographic Procedures I, 4 credits

This course is designed to educationally prepare and develop pre-clinical competence in specific diagnostic procedures through a combination of lecture and laboratory. It is an introduction to theory and principles of diagnostic radiography of the upper limb, lower limb, chest and bony thorax.

Prerequisite: BIO 121 or equivalent; Co-requisite: MI 200. Fall only

MI 204/204L Radiographic Procedures II, 4 credits

This course is designed to educationally prepare and develop pre-clinical competence in specific diagnostic procedures through a combination of lecture and laboratory. It is a continuation of Radiographic Procedures I. It is an introduction to theory and principles of diagnostic radiography of the vertebral column, surgical radiography, abdomen, gastrointestinal system, biliary tract, urinary system, and cranium.

Prerequisite: MI 203/203L. Spring only

MI 214 Radiation Biology and Protection, 2 credits

A study of the effects of ionizing radiation on living matter, both acute and chronic; changes in molecules, cells, tissues, genetics, and embryology are presented. Topics such as patient protection, personnel protection, maximum possible dose, and exposure monitoring are explored.

Pre-requisites: MI 125, MI 126

MI 220/220L Radiographic Physics and Equipment (Lab), 2 credits

This course explores the fundamentals of x-ray properties, production of ionizing radiation and its interactions, x-ray circuitry, and equipment through a combination of lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisite: PHY 118 or permission of instructor. Spring only

MI 225 Clinical Experience III, 2 credits

Continuation of MI 160, including rotation through out-patient facilities and operating room within the hospital. 16 hours per week. Four evening rotations (3-10 pm.)

Prerequisites: MI 160, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Fall only

MI 243 Radiographic Image Evaluation I, 2 credits

The course is designed to provide a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of minimum imaging standards; discussion of problem-solving techniques; and the factors that can affect image quality of the upper limb, lower limb, chest and bony thorax..

Corequisite: MI 203/703, or by permission of instructor. Fall only

MI 244 Radiographic Image Evaluation II, 2 credits

This course is designed to provide a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of minimum imaging standards; discussion of problem-solving techniques; and the factors that can affect image quality of the vertebral column, surgical radiography, abdomen, gastrointestinal system, biliary tract, urinary system, and cranium..

Prerequisite: MI 204 and 243, or by permission of the instructor. Spring only

MI 245 Clinical Experience IV, 3 credits

Continuation of MI 225. Practical application of theory and skills acquired in all phases of the curriculum. Three evening rotations- 3-10 pm. 24 hours per week. Rotations through Computed Tomography, Special Procedures, and three other advanced modalities of student's choice in preparation for senior year internship.

Prerequisites: MI 225, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Spring only

MI 253 Imaging Pathology, 2 credits

This course will offer a foundation in the basic principles of pathology. The focus is on the appearances of diseases and injury diagnosed by medical imaging procedures. Etiology, treatment and prognosis will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: MI 244. Fall only

MI 260 Clinical Experience V, 2 credits

Final experience in the general radiography department to include indirect supervision in areas of demonstrated competency. 40 hours per week. Out-patient as well as five evening rotations (3-10 p.m.).

Prerequisites: MI 245, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Summer Term B (July–August) 6 weeks.

MI 265 Clinical Experience VI, 2 credits

Advanced practical application of theory and skills in specialty areas. 16 hours per week. Optional minor rotations or internship in specialty areas begin.

Prerequisites: MI 260, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Fall only

MI 275 Clinical Experience VII, 2 credits

Continuation of MI 265. 16 hours per week. Optional minor rotations or internship in specialty areas. Senior research project.

Prerequisites: MI 265, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, current liability insurance, criminal background clearance. Spring (May grads), Fall (December grads).

MI 310 Advanced Imaging Procedures, 3 credits

Students will explore advanced diagnostic imaging and therapeutic procedures. Weekly lectures will focus on specialized imaging equipment and patient populations. The historical development of imaging equipment, indications and contraindications for use, and procedures performed will be covered. Topics include, but are not limited to, angiography and interventional radiography, computed tomography, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging, sonography, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and forensic imaging.

MI 311 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals, 3 credits

This course focuses on cross sectional anatomy as it applies to medical imaging. The ability to locate and identify structures in the axial, sagittal, coronal and oblique plane is a necessary skill in many imaging and therapeutic modalities. Volumetric data sets and 3-D reconstruction of the body structures are increasingly important in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Both normal and abnormal anatomy will be discussed.

MI 400 Issues in Medical Imaging, 1 credit

This course involves discussion of current issues relevant to medical imaging and their impact upon the profession. Topics include, but are not limited to mandatory vs. voluntary continuing education, licensure, multiskilling, regional vs. programmatic accreditation, and charting and documentation.

Prerequisite: Senior level status or permission of instructor Fall (first seven weeks) only (traditional format).

MI 415 Senior Seminar, 0 credit

This course assists students in preparation for the ARRT examination taken upon graduation.

Prerequisite: MI 260, must be an M.I. Major. Fall (December grads). Spring (May grads)

MI 450/450L Quality Management in Medical Imaging Sciences (Lab), 2 credits

Through lecture and lab, this course focuses on quality management and its associated topics of quality assurance and quality control as they relate to the field of medical imaging. Particular emphasis is on quality control which is the part of the overall program that deals with instrumentation and equipment. Methods used to test, evaluate, and ensure radiographic quality are covered.

Prerequisite: MI 126. Spring only (traditional format).

MI 480 Special Topics in Medical Imaging, Variable credits

Topics vary from semester to semester and are announced with pre-registration information. An example of courses offered include those in magnetic resonance imaging, CT scan, bone densitometry, and sonography.

Careers in the Field of Medical Imaging (Radiography)

Who are Radiologic Technologists?

ASRT RADCADEMY: Radiologic Technology 101

Careers in Radiography

Radiographer(R)Computed Tomography Technologist (CT)
Mammographer (M)Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist (MR)
Nuclear Medicine Technologist (N) Or (CNMT)Sonographer (RDMS)
Radiation Therapist (T)Quality Management (QM)
Cardiovascular Interventional Technologist (CV)Special Procedures Technologist
Bone Densitometrist (BD)Health Physicist
AdministratorTeacher
Sales Representative

Medical Imaging Compared to Diagnostic Medical Sonography

Medical Imaging

Diagnostic Medical Sonography

Similarities

Both professions require individuals to be properly educated, detail oriented, and have a desire to work in a direct patient care field. Each of the two fields produce diagnostic images that are interpreted by a qualified physician to assist the patient in acquiring an accurate diagnosis.

Job Titles

Radiographer
Radiologic Technologist

Sonographer
Ultrasound Technologist

Roles

Diagnostic radiographic images, Computed Tomography, Mammography, Cardiac Catheterization, Special Procedures and Bone Densitometry images are produced utilizing ionizing radiation. The images may evaluate bony anatomy and/or internal organs.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging utilizes a magnetic field and radiofrequency pulses to produce diagnostic images.

Radiation Therapy employs radiation to treat malignancies of many parts of the body.

Radiographers and individuals credentialed in specialty areas are responsible for acquiring quality images or administering treatment with great attention to radiation protection practices for the patient and the public.

Sonography images from the unborn to the geriatric; head to toe using high frequency soundwaves to produce images of internal anatomical structures.

Sonographers are responsible for performing the examination, optimizing image quality, assessing the image, and generating a worksheet to describe the examination findings to assist the interpreting physician in making the final diagnosis and report.

Specialty Areas

Computed Tomography (CT)
Nuclear Medicine
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Mammography
Cardiac Catheterization
Mammography
Special Procedures
Bone Densitometry
Radiation Therapy

Abdominal
Breast
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Thyroid
Urology
Vascular

Employment Opportunities

Medical Imaging professionals have many employment opportunities that include:

  • Medical Imaging (Radiology) departments in a hospital
  • Out-patient Imaging Centers
  • Mobile Imaging
  • Pediatric Hospital
  • Pain Management Clinics
  • Urology office
  • Women’s Imaging Centers
  • Cancer Treatment Centers

Sonography specialties and areas in which sonographers can be employed include, but not limited to:

  • General Sonography departments in a hospital or out-patient imaging center (abdominal, thyroid, pelvis, OB, vascular)
  • Mobile Imaging
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatric Hospital
  • Perinatology centers
  • Urology office
  • Vascular surgeon offices
  • Women’s Imaging Centers

Professional Societies/National Credentialing Organization

ASRT – www.asrt.org

ARRT – www.arrt.org

SDMS - www.sdms.org
AIUM - www.aium.org
ARDMS - www.ardms.org
ARRT(S) - www.arrt.org

Program Accreditation Information

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) through the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography (JRCDMS)

Medical Imaging (Radiography) Program Video

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