Physics

Physics is considered by many to be the most basic of the sciences. It impacts directly on the study of Biology and Chemistry, and can be a useful adjunct to the study of Mathematics, Computer Science and other professional areas. The Physics program offers courses for Science, Mathematics and Computer Science majors and for students in many of the professional programs, such as Speech-Language Pathology, Medical Imaging, Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy. Physics courses may also enrich the education of Humanities majors.

Physics Department Chairperson: Dr. Orleski

Course Descriptions

PHY 117 Physics Introduction I, 4 credits

This course provides an overview of physics topics in areas of mechanics and heat for non-science majors at an introductory level, emphasizing conceptual development and qualitative and quantitative (using algebra and trigonometry) applications of these concepts to real world physical examples. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

PHY 118 Physics Introduction II, 4 credits

This course provides an overview of physics topics in areas of electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, light, and modern physics for non-science majors at an introductory level, emphasizing conceptual development and qualitative and quantitative (using algebra and trigonometry) applications of these concepts to real world physical examples. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.
Prerequisite: PHY 117 or permission of instructor

PHY 121 Energy in Our World, 3 credits

A study of the various forms of energy with relationship to other physical concepts. Includes a study of energy production, transformation and usage in our world, and effects on human lifestyles and the environment.
Lecture: 3 hours.

PHY 135 Introduction to Physical Science, 4 credits

An introduction to selected areas of the physical sciences of astronomy, chemistry and physics, primarily in the area of physics.
Integrated Lecture/Laboratory: 5 hours.

PHY 141 Introduction to Astronomy, 3 credits

An introduction to selected areas of astronomy including historical perspectives, and current theories and knowledge. Lecture: 3 hours. Students may not take both PHY 141 and PHY 145: Observational Astronomy, nor may they take PHY 141 and the Observational Astronomy Lab (PHY 145L).

PHY 142 Earth Science, 3 credits

A study of Earth's physical environment. Weather and climate, oceans, rocks, minerals, and landforms are explored individually and in relation to one another.
Lecture: 3 hours.

PHY 145 Observational Astronomy, 4 credits

An introduction to selected areas of astronomy including historical perspectives, current theories and knowledge, and experience in astronomical observations. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Must be taken concurrently with Observational Astronomy Laboratory (PHY 145L). Students may not take both PHY 145 and PHY 141: Introduction to Astronomy, nor may they take PHY 141 and the Observational Astronomy Lab (PHY 145L).

PHY 221 General Physics I, 4 credits

Fundamentals of mechanics and heat.
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.
Prerequisite: either MTH 165 or MTH 171

PHY 222 General Physics II, 4 credits

Fundamentals of light, sound, electromagnetism and an introduction to selected areas of modern physics.
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.
Prerequisite: PHY 221

PHY 341 Modern Physics, 3 credits

Physics of the 20th Century, including the Bohr atom, spectra, x-rays, matter waves, radioactivity, nuclear energy, relativity, quantum mechanics, and fundamental particles.
Lecture: 3 hours.
Prerequisite: PHY 222

PHY 413 Physics Cooperative Education 3-6 credits

Academic study combined with work experience in the community.
(On demand)

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